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Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 57 total)
  • Profile photo of DubstepDubstep
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    @dubstep
    Join Date: 2012
    Post Count: 395
    Profile photo of JpcashflowJpcashflow
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    @jpcashflow
    Join Date: 2007
    Post Count: 575

    Looking forward to see how the stock markets react today, I bought a whole heap of shares at 4:15 PM on the ASX. At 4:15 allot of the shares where down 2.15% to 3.00% to previous trade day.

    Will provide feed back in a few hours

    Jpcashflow | JP Financial Group
    http://www.jpfinancialgroup.com.au
    Email Me | Phone Me

    Your first port of call in finance :)

    Profile photo of FreckleFreckle
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    @freckle
    Join Date: 2012
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    I doubt you'll see anything spectacular. A rising dollar will keep a lid on the ASX is my guess. What are you chasing JP? 

    Profile photo of jmsracheljmsrachel
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    @jmsrachel
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    Jp, I know nothing about shares so could you explain this to me, what is the difference between the shares you purchased yesterday and going to the casino and putting it on black? Isn’t what you done another form of gambling?

    Profile photo of JpcashflowJpcashflow
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    @jpcashflow
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    Post Count: 575

    Hi Joe,

    With my shares, I have two accounts:

    1) Long term capital growth shares: Which provide dividends x 2 per year

    2) Short term shares, I purchase shares that fluctuate with the market

    Difference between Casino and Shares, if i go to the Casino I cant minimize my risk, because once its land on the opposite color im stuffed.

    With shares just like any other investment vehicle allot of research and due dillgence is required.

    Jpcashflow | JP Financial Group
    http://www.jpfinancialgroup.com.au
    Email Me | Phone Me

    Your first port of call in finance :)

    Profile photo of FreckleFreckle
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    @freckle
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    Post Count: 1,681
    Jpcashflow wrote:

    Difference between Casino and Shares, if i go to the Casino I cant minimize my risk, because once its land on the opposite color im stuffed

    Only for games of chance. Skill based gambling can be very lucrative. Added bonus is your winnings are not taxable. Had a client who was pro gambler. Started when he was 18. By the time he was 28 he was buying million dollars houses for cash.  Blackjack (he card counts and reckons it's easy) poker (luvs the tournaments) and sports betting (NRL & AFL mainly) are his primary areas. He was telling me their ROI is around 20%. Can't argue with that.

    His worst year he only made $80k (tax free). He averages around $150-200k/yr and his best year was $600k

    Profile photo of JT7JT7
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    @jt7
    Join Date: 2010
    Post Count: 286
    jmsrachel wrote:
    Jp, I know nothing about shares so could you explain this to me, what is the difference between the shares you purchased yesterday and going to the casino and putting it on black? Isn't what you done another form of gambling?

    You can get to know a sector of the market particularly well.

    For example, if you have a look at Precious Metal Miners when gold appeared to hit a low of $US1180 in June. The miners were over sold heavily and for the following 6 weeks the PM market rebounded and the miners shadowed that bounce.

    A good example of this sort of movement would have been Saracen Mineral Holdings ASX code SAR. SAR hit a low of around the 10c mark and moved up to around 32c a share. I realise it's difficult to pick the bottom and top of the market but still good money to be made trading in and out of those stocks if you are watching the market closely. 

    If you know the fundamentals of a particular market you can also predict with accuracy particular future movements. Again I'll use the PM market as an example, when economic data is released it will have an effect on the PM market. Poor economic data such as a poor US Nonfarm Payrolls release which ultimately effects further QE tapering most likely will cause gold and silver to rise. However, in saying that, the markets have been extremely erratic of late.  There are also a range of other economic data that will effect the PM market for example. 

    Profile photo of JT7JT7
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    @jt7
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    Yes well…. Gold up $49 over night. I think I might take the goldies out for a run this morning.

    Anyone care to join me?

    Sure beats all in on red on the roulette table! 

    Profile photo of FreckleFreckle
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    @freckle
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    JT7 wrote:
    Yes well…. Gold up $49 over night. I think I might take the goldies out for a run this morning.

    Anyone care to join me?

    Sure beats all in on red on the roulette table! 

    It's rolling with the USD nothing more. I think you missed the boat. I expect to see a smack down soon, perhaps Fri US markets.

    Profile photo of JT7JT7
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    @jt7
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    Freckle wrote:
    JT7 wrote:
    Yes well…. Gold up $49 over night. I think I might take the goldies out for a run this morning.

    Anyone care to join me?

    Sure beats all in on red on the roulette table! 

    It's rolling with the USD nothing more. I think you missed the boat. I expect to see a smack down soon, perhaps Fri US markets.

    Hey Freckle,

    been on the boat a while and doing quite nicely. Sure….smack downs there's been plenty of those mate and I just see them as just another buying opportunity. 

    Green day today. Take some off the top buy on the dip. 

    Enchanted Wanderer
    Participant
    @enchanted-wanderer
    Join Date: 2013
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    I think the topic is synonymous to the "sky is falling down" articles pushed by newsletter artists trying to sell you their system to survive in the coming crisis.

    The truth is that central banks around the world are standing by ready to backstop any backdrop that may occur. Everything is highly manipulated these days therefore normal indicators do not apply, that's why despite numerous predictions of collapse that on the surface make perfect sense the market just keeps going up and up.

    My advice – keep investing, just don't follow the crowd and don't buy overpriced properties using 95% leverage without enough cash in the bank to withstand 2-3 years of interest payments on the loan then you will be fine.

    If crisis hits people would still need to live somewhere, they may not be able to pay outrages rents but they would be able to pay something. I remember in GFC my tenant was one of the first to lose his banking job. To stay in the property he applied for government rent assistance and with some other odd income was able to navigate through the crisis. I think if crisis were to happen again many people would do the same – ask government to print some money and give it to them.

    Profile photo of FreckleFreckle
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    CB's can suppress interest rates, govt's can borrow till the cows come home and banks can push the credit bubble ever bigger but at some point we will have to pay the piper.

    This graphic of global GDP is an eye opener if you look at all the economies that will tank when the US, Japan, EU go tits up.

    US + Japan + China + India + France + UK + Spain + Italy + Netherland + Portugal + Ireland + Brazil + Argentina + Greece =>60% of global GDP

    All of these countries have high debt that is still growing faster than growth or are already in substantial trouble. This only ends one way. Economies and financial systems are now so intertwined that the collapse of one will drag the others down just like mountain climbers roped together in an avalanche.

    This graphic illustrates just how precarious things are becoming. Debt (red) is now growing exponentially faster than growth (blue) and has been since the mid 80's

    "At the current rate of debt increase the U.S. will pushing 130% of debt to real GDP by 2018.  This is, of course, not including the funding needs that will ultimately be required to support the increased costs of the entitlement programs of Social Security, Medicare and now the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  The reality is that debt needs will substantially increase as entitlement programs continue to consume ever larger chunks of the current budget.  By 2020 the current welfare programs alone are expected to require 75% of all federal revenues and this does not include the impact of the ACA(Obamacare).  This, of course, is unsustainable."

    I will be utterly surprised if we manage to get through the next 5 years without this thing going totally off the wall.

    Profile photo of DubstepDubstep
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    @dubstep
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    I will second that !

    Profile photo of FreckleFreckle
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    @freckle
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    Some days I wonder if things will last 5 weeks let alone 5 years. God help you if you have all your eggs tucked up in the US market

    This says it all:

    The Carlyle Group’s Latest Investment… Trailer Parks

    • Because the cost of relocating a home is expensive, residents are less likely to move away. “Our customers have no alternative shot at homeownership, nor do they [normally] even have the credit scores and quality to seek anything better,” Mr. Rolfe said. “They never leave the park they are in, and the revenues are unbelievably stable as a result.”

    Profile photo of moxi10moxi10
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    This says it all:

    The Carlyle Group’s Latest Investment… Trailer Parks

    • Because the cost of relocating a home is expensive, residents are less likely to move away. “Our customers have no alternative shot at homeownership, nor do they [normally] even have the credit scores and quality to seek anything better,” Mr. Rolfe said. “They never leave the park they are in, and the revenues are unbelievably stable as a result.”

    [/quote]   Perfect description of a "captive market"

    Profile photo of FreckleFreckle
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    @freckle
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    moxi10 wrote:

     Perfect description of a "captive market"

    Yep. Captured by big money. The small time PI doesn't realise they have the tiger by the tail.

    Profile photo of JT7JT7
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    @jt7
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    Freckle wrote:
    moxi10 wrote:

     Perfect description of a "captive market"

    Yep. Captured by big money. The small time PI doesn't realise they have the tiger by the tail.

    quoting the words used by the truly great late Jim Rohn, 'things are…..MESSED UP' 

    Profile photo of JT7JT7
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    @jt7
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    JT7 wrote:
    Freckle wrote:
    moxi10 wrote:

     Perfect description of a "captive market"

    Yep. Captured by big money. The small time PI doesn't realise they have the tiger by the tail.

    quoting the words used by the truly great late Jim Rohn, 'things are…..MESSED UP' 

    By the way, I've got more to contribute I just need a bit of time. I've got a freight train running through my head on account of a date with a bottle of Sailer Jerry last night! 

    Profile photo of FreckleFreckle
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    JT7 wrote:
    I've got a freight train running through my head on account of a date with a bottle of Sailer Jerry last night! 

    I rarely suffer from hangovers thank God but heartburn absolutely kills me on bourbon and coke not to mention it plays Mary hell with old ticker.

    Profile photo of FreckleFreckle
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    Something that is rarely discussed in a direct sense but none the less should be considered in the scheme of things. While GFC08 was widely considered to be a 'Financial System Gone Wrong' kind of thing it is quite likely something more complex and sinister than simply a few greedy banksters and a corrupted system. Corrupt systems and banksters may simply be an opportunity waiting to be captured by others intend on shifting the balance of power.

    Economic Warfare: Risks and Responses

    • Serious risks to the global economic system were exposed by the crisis of 2008,

      raising legitimate questions regarding the cause of the turmoil. An estimated $50

      trillion of global wealth evaporated in the crisis with more than a quarter of that

      loss suffered by the United States and her citizens.

    • A number of potential causative factors exist, including sub-prime real estate loans, a

      housing bubble, excessive leverage, and a failed regulatory system. Beyond these,

      however, the risks of financial terrorism and/or economic warfare also must be

      considered. The stakes are simply too high for these potential triggers to be ignored.

    Phase 1/3

    • The first phase was a speculative run-up in oil prices that generated as much

      as $2 trillion of excess wealth for oil-producing nations, filling the coffers of

      Sovereign Wealth Funds, especially those that follow Shariah Compliant

      Finance. This phase appears to have begun in 2007 and lasted through June 2008.

    Phase 2/3

    • The second phase appears to have begun in 2008 with a series of bear raids

      targeting U.S. financial services firms that appeared to be systemically

      significant.

    Phase 3/3 (yet to come or is it already underway?)

    • The risk of a Phase Three has quickly emerged, suggesting a potential direct

      economic attack on the U.S. Treasury and U.S. dollar.

    But, we remain left with the critical unanswered questions of who and how?

    The recent seizure of $134 billion face value in supposedly counterfeit U.S. Federal

    Reserve bonds underscores the reality of the economic threat.

    • "According to economic analysis the severe financial crisis ravaging the US and

        hitting the international community on all continents has its economic roots in

        two major realms: One was the overbearing political pressure put on Wall Street

        to release loans into unprepared sectors of society and two, was the

        miscalculation – some say the drunkenness- of Wall Street in accepting these

        immense risks. But according to Political Economy assessment, there may have

        been a third player in the crisis: OPEC, or more precisely, radical circles within

        oil Producing regimes in the Peninsula. The thesis argue that combined Salafist

        Wahabi and Muslim Brotherhood circles in the Gulf -with consent from the

        Iranian side on this particular issue, used the escalating pricing of Oil over the

        past year to push the financial crisis in the US over the cliff. The high point‘ in

        his analysis is the timing between the skyrocketing of the prices at the pumps and

        the widening of the real estate crisis. In short the ―Oil-push put the market out

        of balance hitting back at Wall Street. Basically, there was certainly a crisis in

        mismanagement domestically (with its two above mentioned roots), but the possible

        OPEC economic offensive‘ crumbled the defenses of US economy in few months."

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