All Topics / Overseas Deals / Lots of Interesting news in NZ…

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  • Profile photo of Kiwi-FullaKiwi-Fulla
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    From the mayor of Invercargill
    ">http://www.icc.govt.nz/shadomx/apps/fms/fmsdownload.cfm?file_uuid=8D861234-9896-4E29-F1A8-4D81777A8975&siteName=icc

    Times could be tough… but the tough get on with it!.
    Cheers,
    Kiwi

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    Profile photo of oziozi
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    Thanks for posting that Kiwi! I guess Tim Shadbolt’s confidence in obtaining another $80M over the next 12 years is good news for Invercargill. I’d be interested to see what he does with it. I agree with him that protecting resources will be a big thing, but getting people to visit Invercargill will be important too.

    Cheers,
    Ozi

    Profile photo of snowkiwisnowkiwi
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    Thanks Kiwi,
    One of the things I’ve always liked about Tim Shadbolt is his willingness to throw bold ideas out there for people to think about. Whether they were his ideas or someone elses, Invercargill and Southland in general have done a great job of turning the popluation trends around over the last 5 or so years.

    On the positive side, they are in a much better position now than they were 10 years ago. I’m sure councils around the country, and the world for that matter, would love to have to ask “What are we going to do with all this money?”

    Given the openness and bluntness he’s brought to issues before and the publicity this should generate around Southland, I’m actually pretty confident they’ll do the job over the next 10 years.

    Of course the proof is in the Haggis (pudding), isn’t it.

    Thanks for the update.

    Craig.

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    Profile photo of muppetmuppet
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    NZ residential property market risky, says OECD report

    Monday June 26, 2006
    By Anne Gibson

    New Zealand’s residential property market is one of the world’s most risky and second only to Denmark in the likelihood of a serious price correction, says the OECD.

    The organisation studied 17 countries and found New Zealand one of the most hazardous markets – the single most volatile country in which to own a house because it had more booms and busts than the others.

    The report – “Are House Prices Nearing a Peak?” – found that since the 1970s, New Zealand has had more housing peaks than any other country.

    The duration of our housing cycles have been shorter and more cyclical, the report said.

    Peaks were invariably followed by a downturn and a price drop.

    New Zealand was at extreme risk of a real estate downturn, particularly if interest rates rose by only 1 per cent when the country would have an 83 per cent chance of a big price correction, the OECD found.

    Reserve Bank Governor Alan Bollard is not expected to push up rates further this year.

    The OECD said Denmark’s chances of a house price crash were the highest at 95 per cent and Japan’s the lowest at 0 per cent. New Zealand was one of the world’s most vulnerable housing markets. But Denmark and New Zealand had also consistently topped world house price charts in the last two years, having experienced the steepest value increases.

    The OECD report by Paul van den Noord shows that if prices were to continue rising this year at the same rate as in 2005 and if interest rates rose by a percentage point, Denmark, New Zealand, France and Sweden would be almost certain to suffer a crash. The Danes are most vulnerable, followed by the Kiwis then the French.

    Real Estate Institute data this year shows the market plateauing and prices staying stable rather than rising fast as they did last year.

    “A rise in interest rates by 100 to 200 basis points would suffice to raise the probability of a peak in the United States, France, Denmark, Ireland, New Zealand, Spain and Sweden,” the report said. The report follows rankings from Britain’s Economist that put New Zealand at the top of the world for the steepest price rises. In June 2004, New Zealand topped a chart of house price rises in the world’s developed countries.

    In an article headlined “Hair-raising”, the magazine added New Zealand, Denmark and Switzerland to a list of countries tracked since 1975.

    Shamubeel Eaqub, an economist with Goldman Sachs JBWere in Auckland, said the OECD report might prompt homeowners to question how much money they had tied up in the residential market.

    It was also a warning for New Zealanders not to rely on housing’s good fortunes continuing, he said.

    “This should be good reminder for households to diversify their portfolio because 77 per cent of gross assets are in housing,” he said.

    A spokesman for Finance Minister Michael Cullen dismissed the report, saying any crash was extremely unlikely to occur and was an emotive concept. But the Government was also being careful not to encourage the housing market, he said.

    “The Government is well aware of inflationary pressures in the economy and that’s why it is maintaining a disciplined fiscal policy. Any further fiscal stimulus at this time would add to inflation and increase the risk of interest rate rises which in turn would hurt homeowners.

    “That’s why we regard National’s multibillion-dollar tax cuts as reckless.

    “Had they been introduced, inflation would have risen, as would interest rates and that would have impacted on the housing market,” the spokesman said.

    BNZ economist Tony Alexander also dismissed the OECD report.

    “They use the last quarter of 2005 when New Zealand house prices on average were 15.3 per cent ahead of a year earlier using Real Estate Institute data.

    “Annual increases have already slowed substantially so the scenario they posit is unlikely for New Zealand,” Mr Alexander said.

    John McDermott, Victoria University associate professor of economics and finance, also doubted the chances of the OECD report’s predictions being fulfilled.

    “House prices, while still increasing, are doing so at a slower pace than 2005 and official cash rates are unlikely to increase this year and are likely to be lowered in 2007 so the prospects of the OECD conditions being met seem very low,” he said.

    Real Estate Institute data released this week showed national sales volumes down 17 per cent between May 2003 and last month.

    Auckland volumes dropped 46 per cent from 4078 sales in May 2003 to 2981 sales last month.

    But prices were still rising steeply, up 36 per cent in three years in Auckland, 35 per cent in Wellington, 77 per cent in Christchurch and 96 per cent in Dunedin.

    Agents are reporting an increasingly stressed market. Anne Duncan Real Estate in Mt Albert sent out a flyer this month saying the company was about to launch a series of clearance sales to auction off houses that had been on the Auckland market for a while.

    The glossy flyer, headed “Clearance Sale Special”, said the market had started to settle and was moving into one of its quieter phases.

    Howard Morley, the Real Estate Institute’s president, said housing was proving strong because the national median remained at $305,000 between April and May.

    “The sales statistics show that the market has consolidated. Prices remain strong with a good number of properties continuing to sell which shows a resilient residential property market,” Mr Morley said.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/st…ectid=10388343

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    Profile photo of Kiwi-FullaKiwi-Fulla
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    Very Interesting indeed… however they [baaa]do not look at one key piece of data (or fail to highlight it to give thier story impact…more likely)[withstupid] and that is:

    The cycle frequencies may be hard and fast…. however if you compare the lowest point of the newest Boom/bust cycle to the lowest point of the previous cycle….. you will see that the price is always higher which means that the risk is quite low in fact.

    Take those low points and add them together and divide by 2 to get the average growth….
    WE need to look at the big picture and not herd [baaa]mentality (no disrespect to sheep)[biggrin]
    Food for thought anyway!
    Cheers,
    Kiwi[strum]

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    Profile photo of westanwestan
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    Hi Kiwifella

    it appears the point your missing in this report and the effect if it comes true is that the market will drop; Now is not the time to be buying !

    As i’ve been saying for months why buy at the top of the cycle when you can come back in a year or two (or more) and buy the same house for cheaper. Personally i think the investor who buys at the bottom of the cycle is smart, rather than a sheep.

    The right time to buy is after prices have dropped !!

    wouldn’t you agree ?

    Just for interest the reserve bank governor has reopeated his warnings about the NZ market

    Price of houses will drop, says Reserve Bank head

    Tuesday June 27, 2006
    By Matthew Brockett

    Reserve Bank Governor Alan Bollard expects house prices to start falling by the end of the year as higher interest rates begin to bite.

    regards westan

    USA deals, cash flow equity and capital growth all in one property.
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    Profile photo of Kiwi-FullaKiwi-Fulla
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    Hey Westan… Good to see you back on track again! [biggrin]

    I agree with your wholeheartedly….. to a point. What you say is correct , however the ripple effect from house prices dropping in the large cities … is usually because the sentiment is that they either are to high, Yeild are too low for investors, or …. pack thinking has gone through the masses thinking “sky is falling … the sky is falling” This is usually the media that pushes this frenzy ahead full steam and hte government has to eventually step in to apply fiscal damage control to slow down the frenzy.

    On the other hand people are still looking outside the cities for good investments and since the cities are quite volatile (upto 25% overpriced) at the moment … they look at risking less capital to buy out where the yeilds are much higher… so a ripple effect will continue to slowly roll throug the lower price bracket houses and make them spike a little…. any how that is just my humble opinion on how things will happen….
    HAve fun out there and …. “Live With Passion”
    Cheers
    Kiwi[strum]

    Why Rent? Rent 2 own!
    http://www.rent2ownaus.com

    Profile photo of LukeNealeLukeNeale
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    Has anyone invested in invergargill recently? What has your house been valued at recently. has it it still increased. I know that house prices and their abilioty to rise and fall according to the market, is still very much determined by where they’re located in the country.
    Take Perth for example. While the East Coast was falling, Perth was booming.
    There are no doubt town in NZ that will continue to rise based on other factors such as popoluation growth, industry investmenet etc..
    I’m looking at Hamilton at the moment.
    Luke

    LIVE ABUNDANTLY
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    Profile photo of westanwestan
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    Hi guys

    kiwifella , how come i’m back on track, i haven’t changed what i’ve been saying for the past 8 month (have i ?)

    Regarding the prices drop, down forget that prices have risen in country town largely to investor sentiment, supply and demand. What happens to the price when the investor pull their heads in ? Which will happen (is happening).

    Thats one of the reasons i’ve sold all but one of my 20 odd NZ properties. Right now Country towns in Victoria are dead as far as sales go . There are no investors buying compared to years ago. My concern is the same could happen in NZ. When i started buying in NZ in 2003, in the areas i was buying, there were homes on the market in areas for 2 years +. So, like i keep saying, if you don’t want to be a long term buy and hold investor be prepared for a rocky time ahead. Its already been a rocky time with the NZ dollar crashing. This will hurt investor bringing cash out of NZ.

    regards westan

    USA deals, cash flow equity and capital growth all in one property.
    International Property Consulting Pty/Ltd.
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    http://www.iproperty.net.au

    Profile photo of Nigel KibelNigel Kibel
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    I think that if you buy good property in main cities in the long term you will do well. I agree with Western that small towns in New Zealand and Australia are not a good option. Sure people made money out of properties in small towns however in many cases these properties are now overpriced. In any boom once prices rise dramatically in the centre other area such as outer suburbs and country increase. However once a market comes off the boil, outer areas drop in value. As an example inner city prices in Melbourne have held up well, outer areas for example new home market has now tightened. In New Zealand unless you are buying in the main cities I would stay away.

    It is a matter of looking at strong growth markets. Thats why I am focusing on Texas and other parts of the United States. The market is overpriced in some areas but underpriced in others. With a population of 295 Million people there are always good deals to be found.
    If you are serious about investing then put the time and effort to do the research it will be more than rewarding.

    Nigel Kibel

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    Profile photo of jebrojebro
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    Hi,
    Has anyone been investing in Wanaka or Queenstown? Both places seem very sound in terms of continuing increasing popularity as holiday destinations. Saw brief commentry by Dolf de Roos who clearly likes Queenstown as a good investment prospect.

    Would be interested to hear from those on the ground.
    Thanks

    jebro

    Profile photo of jebrojebro
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    Have now found another thread talking lots about Queenstown.
    Still interested if anyone has thoughts on Wanaka.
    Thanks

    jebro

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