Forums / Property Investing / Help Needed! / LOW CEILING HEIGHT

Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)
  • Profile photo of FrancesFrances
    Participant
    @frances58
    Join Date: 2018
    Post Count: 1

    I have purchased a home built @1960 on the northern beaches of Sydney.It is split level home on a sloping block. Downstairs has been “filled in” creating a family room, 4th bedroom plus the existing garage and laundry. During a building report (for another buyer) it was reported that the down stairs did not meet minimum standards of 2.4m. It is just short of this with exposed beams supporting a timber floor above. From the floor to underside of the beam is 2.1. it didn’t bother me as it creates valuable living areas and would never have known except for building report.
    Is there a way of making this legal or is there a grandfather clause for older buildings? its perfectly habitable, although noisy but I don’t want to proceed with renos if it will become an issue at resale.

    Profile photo of JaxonJaxon
    Participant
    @jaxona
    Join Date: 2014
    Post Count: 282

    There are no differential standards for buildings on the basis of when they were constructed, or how many units they contain. However, compliance with the Building Code of Australia is not retrospective. Under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, a building only has to comply with the Building Code of Australia at the time of construction. As a result, the Building Code of Australia does not require you to continually update your windows, balcony railings and fire doors etc.

    ince 1998 all Commonwealth States and Territories have had building construction regulated by the ‘Building Code of Australia’ (BCA). As noted in the Housing Broadsheet, 10 September 1948 above, the lack of uniform building regulations created a confusing variety of specifications between states.

    In 1965 the Interstate Standing Committee on Uniform Building Regulations (ISCUBR) was formed. They released the ‘Australian Model Uniform Building Code’ (AMUBC), however this was not uniformly adopted across Australia.

    It was the establishment of the Australian Building Codes Board in 1989 with the aim of introducing uniform building regulations across Australia that resulted in the adoption of the BCA.

    Minimum ceiling heights for habitable rooms is currently 2.4m.

    Profile photo of JaxonJaxon
    Participant
    @jaxona
    Join Date: 2014
    Post Count: 282

    Now I have sold properties with Ceilings under 2.4m for older dwellings, they cannot be classified as bedrooms and technically are not to current code.

    now I would want your insurer to confirm they are covering this (if your renting)

    I would want to be appear this is and isn’t an issue.

    The main thing is your going to have to raise it to get it to comply with code.

    hope this clears a little bit up for you Frances

Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.