All Topics / General Property / Property Managers and landlords – do you change locks?

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 23 total)
  • Profile photo of SteevgSteevg
    Participant
    @steevg
    Join Date: 2007
    Post Count: 14

    A question . . . . .

    When your tenant leaves one of your properties, do you have issues regarding the security of the new tenant?

    Do you change your door locks every time you change a tenant?

    If not, how do you ensure the old tenant is not able to gain access after they have left the premises?

    Is there anything else the investor can do to ensure the safety & security of a new tenant if the locks are'nt changed?

    Profile photo of SpongySpongy
    Participant
    @spongy
    Join Date: 2013
    Post Count: 22

    Good question.  I'd never actually thought about it and knowing how much it cost me to change all the locks when we moved into our PPOR, I can't say I'd be rushing to do it, unless it was specifically requested by the tenant.  I only have one IP and would be keen to hear what others do also.

    Profile photo of Tony FlemingTony Fleming
    Participant
    @the-dark-knight
    Join Date: 2008
    Post Count: 396

    I've never done it or had it requested. You would definetly think it would be a PM's first job though.

    Tony Fleming | Triumphant Property Group
    http://www.triumphantpropertygroup.com.au
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    NSW Buyer's Agent specialising in Western Sydney-Blue Mountains-Orange-Albury

    Profile photo of Jamie MooreJamie Moore
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    @jamie-m
    Join Date: 2010
    Post Count: 5,069
    The Dark Knight wrote:
    I've never done it or had it requested. You would definetly think it would be a PM's first job though.

    Same.

    It's never been raised by any tenants. 

    Cheers

    Jamie

    Jamie Moore | Pass Go Home Loans Pty Ltd
    http://www.passgo.com.au
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    Mortgage Broker assisting clients Australia wide Email: [email protected]

    Profile photo of SteevgSteevg
    Participant
    @steevg
    Join Date: 2007
    Post Count: 14

    I'd be interested to hear how the insurance companies regard the situation – especially here in Australia.

    I spoke with a landlord who owns student accommodation in NZ, and to comply with "his"  insurance requirements, part of the tenant closure procedure was to change external door locks.

    I'm currently looking into solutions other than to change these expensive locks, if anyone is also interested please PM me.

    Steve

    Profile photo of fredo_4305fredo_4305
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    @fredo_4305
    Join Date: 2009
    Post Count: 336

    It would still be classed as unauthorized accessed. Police report would reflect as such if damage were done. Keys could have been taken from current tenant cut and return, keys could have been taken from RE agent's premise. All very hard to prove it was previous tenants their prints would be all over the property regardless. Geez almost like the perfect crime lol

    I would hate for my previous tenants to enter the house trash it and have it repaired to new cheeky ha ha.

    Profile photo of SteevgSteevg
    Participant
    @steevg
    Join Date: 2007
    Post Count: 14

    Agreed,

     . . . . . . . but, better to prevent it happening in the first place eh?

    Police reports, damage repair etc are all very good after the event, but as a tenant, I'd rather know a previous occupant wasn't ABLE to gain access at all. Imagine if it was a family member occupying one of your rooms/houses . . . .  I shudder to think about someone else having a key,and knowing my daughter/ex-wife was in that situation! (Well maybe not ex-wife – lol)

    Profile photo of Jacqui MiddletonJacqui Middleton
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    @jacm
    Join Date: 2009
    Post Count: 2,539

    There are enough legislative things landlords have to comply with that cost money – I don't think changing the locks is necessary unless you have a particularly worrisome ex-tenant.  People have better things to do with their time than break into places they used to live in.  Plenty more to do with your time.  Playing X-Box  takes up a lot of time, apparently.

    If a previous tenant is prepared to use a copied key to gain access, they probably know how to pick locks anyhow, in which case changing the locks is a bit pointless.

    Jacqui Middleton | Middleton Buyers Advocates
    http://www.middletonbuyersadvocates.com.au
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    VIC Buyers' Agents for investors, home buyers & SMSFs.

    Profile photo of GrantMckGrantMck
    Member
    @grantmck
    Join Date: 2013
    Post Count: 36

    HI,

    The only time that I have come across changing the locks is when one of my Tenants moved on, a new Tenant moved in and within the first two weeks the Police arrived on the doorstep looking for the old Tenant! The kind and concerned Policeman suggested that the Tenant change the locks, At a cost of  $240 we changed the locks immediately. Happy Tenant and no issues from there on.

    Regards Grant

    Profile photo of NM7NM7
    Participant
    @nm7
    Join Date: 2010
    Post Count: 45

    Hi all,

    FYI, I recently had changed locks for one of my IPs based on the request of a tenant wanting to move in. They had put in their application & requested the PM for external door locks to be changed. I was happy to do so as I was getting $5 more per week and for them to sign-on a 12 months lease.

    Regards,

    NM7

    Profile photo of Scott No MatesScott No Mates
    Participant
    @scott-no-mates
    Join Date: 2005
    Post Count: 3,856

    Generally, I don't change locks/have them rekeyed. In one instance I had a place with 7 different keys: security doors, front/back doors, side door, dead locks etc. Had them all keyed alike.

    Next time around, will be looking at electronic combination locks ie swipe card type where they can be reprogrammed for the next tenant. Less than $300/lock.

    Profile photo of David RDavid R
    Member
    @david-r
    Join Date: 2013
    Post Count: 2

    I have, only when the last tenant left in a "huff" shell we say. Then I had all the locks keyed the same, it made it easier for my that way.

    But not normally there is no need.

    Profile photo of SteevgSteevg
    Participant
    @steevg
    Join Date: 2007
    Post Count: 14

    Some great feedback guys:

    I'll be erring on the side of caution with my own properties, after a few comments were made within earshot recently. I have a young single mum in one of my houses, and she's already shown concern about the previous tenant. So I'll be doing my best to keep her happy . . . .  and as secure as possible.

    Thanks for the feedback and comments, anyone have issues with student accommodation ?

    Profile photo of Jacqui MiddletonJacqui Middleton
    Participant
    @jacm
    Join Date: 2009
    Post Count: 2,539
    Scott No Mates wrote:
    Next time around, will be looking at electronic combination locks ie swipe card type where they can be reprogrammed for the next tenant. Less than $300/lock.

    Love it.  I'll be implementing the same any time I am faced with changing locks.  Good idea!

    Jacqui Middleton | Middleton Buyers Advocates
    http://www.middletonbuyersadvocates.com.au
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    VIC Buyers' Agents for investors, home buyers & SMSFs.

    Profile photo of Richard TaylorRichard Taylor
    Participant
    @qlds007
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 12,024

    Steevg, seeing you are fairly new to the forum I will be gentle. 

    Normally when you come on and post a question seeking advice and are lucky enough to get a response from someone like JacM who is an experienced property investor and established forum contributor it is poor form to tell them you disagree.

    Glad to see you have edited your initial response but if you are asking for advice or an opinion best to welcome all comments and then decide off line what you want to do.

    You will find if you adopt such an attitude from your first couple of posts you will get more quality responses.

    On a separate note i have 41 investment properties and certainly never change the locks each time a tenant vacates.

    Cheers

    Yours in Finance

    Richard Taylor | Mortgage Broker helping investors build their wealth thru property
    http://www.mortgagecapitalaustralia.com.au
    Email Me

    100% Investment Finance now available on selected properties. Email us for further information.

    Profile photo of SteevgSteevg
    Participant
    @steevg
    Join Date: 2007
    Post Count: 14

    The idea of the electronic combination lock is certainly worthy of consideration, a one off cost, and totally effective.

    I recently read on another forum about a PM who had permission from the landlord to change the alarm code each time a new tenancy begins. Doesn't necessarily stop a "key-holder" from gaining access, but it'd certainly raise an alarm, and may act as a deterrent.

    Profile photo of DWolfeDWolfe
    Participant
    @dwolfe
    Join Date: 2009
    Post Count: 1,253

    Hi all,

    Being both a tenant and a landlord, I've never changed the locks as landlord and never had a landlord/PM change the locks for me.

    The exception to this of course is when I'm renovating. I'll change the front door lock, generally coz I'm changing out the whole door anyway. I have had ex-tenants visit during renovations and it's a nice feeling to know that they can't just waltz in the front door.

    As a tenant you can ask for the door locks to be changed at your expense, I must say most suburbs I have lived in I haven't bothered.

    I have been robbed recently and they broke the fence and smashed a window, so a dinky thing like a having a key wasn't really going to worry them!

    As the landlord it is up to you what 'extras' you do, tenants don't expect the locks to get changed out each year/6 mths with a tenancy change.

    I like the electronic option, I'm thinking keyless entry on the next house :)

    Cheers

    D

    DWolfe | www.homestagers.com.au
    http://www.homestagers.com.au
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    Profile photo of SteevgSteevg
    Participant
    @steevg
    Join Date: 2007
    Post Count: 14

    Presumably the "Keyless" approach relies on the unit being permanently powered ?

    I'm interested to understand how a power outage may or may not affect the system? 

    I'm guessing internal backup batteries are part of the unit, similar to an alarm ?

    I'd be interested to checkout any recommendations members may have for these systems.

    Thanks

    Profile photo of craigrachowcraigrachow
    Participant
    @craigrachow
    Join Date: 2013
    Post Count: 6

    for the couple of hundred (i have a unit one front and one rear door) i replaced the locks. this also gave me a opportunity to get 4 sets of keys (2 for Tennant, 1 for PM, one for me.) its all tax deductible so im happy as everyone has a key, tennats are secure and happy and PM's have a key also.

    Profile photo of propertyboypropertyboy
    Participant
    @propertyboy
    Join Date: 2008
    Post Count: 232

    What are you required by law to do? Does the Residential Tenancy Act specify that locks have to be changed? I just had a tenant request locks to be changed. Am I required to do this or can I say if you want it done you have to pay for it yourself?

    I heard locksmiths can come around change the groove in the lock and cut a new key which saves putting a new lock on the door, is this true?

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