Viewing 17 posts - 21 through 37 (of 37 total)
  • Profile photo of RPIRPI
    Participant
    @rpi
    Join Date: 2012
    Post Count: 308

    I deal with agents, buyers and sellers everyday.  Stuff is selling very quickly in Brisbane at present.

    Agents are struggling to get listings, we are seeing a lot of multiple offers for properties that we draft contracts on.

    It is a very active market in the sub $800k price range at present.

    Whether that translates to growth or not I am not in a position to say.

    RPI | Certus Legal Group / PRO Town Planners
    http://www.certuslegal.com.au
    Email Me | Phone Me

    Property Lawyer & Town Planner

    Profile photo of jmsracheljmsrachel
    Participant
    @jmsrachel
    Join Date: 2012
    Post Count: 711

    I wouldn’t bother entering a debate with freckle. Haven’t seen him defeated yet.

    biggaz13 wrote:
    Freckle

    How on earth have you made 1115 posts in 16 months????
    I decided against trawling through 1115 posts so I’ll ask here:

    In fact, I will re-ask Geddo’s question from above: Why do you hang around a property investing website when you state “the entry time for property is not now. Hasn’t been for years now”?

    I am confused by another comment you made: “Never said property as a class was a bad investment”. Then you go onto explain why property as a class is such a bad investment. Well, a bad investment until certain “fundamentals” have improved. Which fundamentals would you like to see improved before advising everyone to jump into the property investing marketplace??

    You made this interesting comment: “If the dollar keeps falling you might see the large markets struggle as overseas investors pause or some prefer to liquidate and move to other markets”. I was under the impression that if the A$ continue to fall then it would actually encourage international investment as investors will get more bang for their buck.

    You appear to expend a lot of energy advising people not to buy property as an asset class until fundamentals improve. What asset class do you advice people to enter for wealth creation?? If any?

    Flush. Oops. There goes the Perth market down the crapper. It might drift lower. It might not. Mandurah?? Is there a correlation between the Mandurah property market and the market in Perth??

    You state there will be a “substantial correction” in the value of properties in Australia. For this to happen Australians selling their property will have to accept a substantial loss if they sell. I suspect many Australians would rather hold the property than accept a substantial loss.

    I used to get this daily email: “Money Morning” and “The Daily Reckoning”. Wow. Some of the most negative financial news you could get every day in your inbox. The worldwide collapse was imminent. “BUY GOLD” they screamed (Silver was ok to). “SELL YOUR HOUSES – Market correction 30% – 60% around the corner”. Well that was back in 2010. Maybe one day their message will be vindicated. But not today. I couldn’t stand their negativity so I deleted the subscription.

    Go well Freckle of Mandurah.

    Profile photo of Jacqui MiddletonJacqui Middleton
    Participant
    @jacm
    Join Date: 2009
    Post Count: 2,539

    Uncle Freckle I reckon you should edit your signature to include your key message :)  That way it shall be seen each time you post angel

    Jacqui Middleton | Middleton Buyers Advocates
    http://www.middletonbuyersadvocates.com.au
    Email Me | Phone Me

    VIC Buyers' Agents for investors, home buyers & SMSFs.

    Profile photo of FreckleFreckle
    Blocked
    @freckle
    Join Date: 2012
    Post Count: 1,681
    Karley12 wrote:
    Hi all

    biggaz13 – I agree with the sentiment of your post. The Mandurah and Perth markets couldn't be more different

    And who else are you masquerading here as? Playing tag with biggaz13 are we?? 

    Quote:
    I have met very few people who want to live in Mandurah (for a variety of reasons) and this obviously equates to poor growth and in Mandurah's case, a decline from when everyone rushed in.

    Don't get around much do you. Mid 2012 the vacancy rate in Mandurah were tight. Today the selection is at least 3 times bigger. We have friends that also rent down here and who recently changed properties (2 months ago). Acquired a place within 2 weeks compared to 3 months initially.

    Regional towns helped absorb the influx generated by the mining expansion. As that expansion winds down the regional towns are likely to be the first to contract again. Canaries in the coal mine perhaps. Perth will benefit for a while as those who were pushed to the fringes look to move closer or into Perth as vacancy pressures ease.

    Quote:
    I live 12km from the Perth CBD and most homes are sold before being advertised on the market – all at under 400K and renting for at least $350/week. This area is just starting to grow, and a very different picture to Mandurah!

    A simplistic or amateurs view of a market. Perth's growth and boom was a direct result of a resource boom. You could securely invest in a market when you could see ever growing investment being committed to the commercial sector. The reverse should hold true correct?

    The mining boom is over big time. The property market will contract as a consequence. I can't tell you how much or when it will end but one thing I know from my experience within the resource sector here is that if it contracts as fast and as hard as resources are now then it's going to hurt a lot of people big time. The worst of it is likely to be absorbed by the regional areas first. Perth will be the last to cop it but it will feel the effects. Of that I'm sure

    Profile photo of FreckleFreckle
    Blocked
    @freckle
    Join Date: 2012
    Post Count: 1,681
    JacM wrote:
    Uncle Freckle I reckon you should edit your signature to include your key message :)  That way it shall be seen each time you post angel

    That'd be no fun Jac's.  I like to sneak up on the muppets and surprise them. A big fancy sig block is like blowing a bugle as you walk through the door.devil

    Profile photo of FreckleFreckle
    Blocked
    @freckle
    Join Date: 2012
    Post Count: 1,681
    biggaz13 wrote:
    I am confused

    Certainly are. Keep working at it I'm sure you'll figure it out sooner or later.

    Profile photo of Nigel KibelNigel Kibel
    Participant
    @nigel-kibel
    Join Date: 2005
    Post Count: 1,425

    For investing you should always look at around the medium value in an area. I would not invest in the high end however I would not invest in the low end either.

    Nigel Kibel | Property Know How
    http://propertyknowhow.com.au
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    We have just launched a new website join our membership today

    Profile photo of LancehaterLancehater
    Participant
    @lancehater
    Join Date: 2008
    Post Count: 19

    Back to Brisbane guys! What suburbs do we like within 10 k to CBC?

    Profile photo of Karley12Karley12
    Participant
    @karley12
    Join Date: 2012
    Post Count: 4

    F: And who else are you masquerading here as? Playing tag with biggaz13 are we??

    Not masquerading as anyone, Freckle! You are a harsh audience aren't you? ;)

    F: Don't get around much do you. Mid 2012 the vacancy rate in Mandurah were tight. Today the selection is at least 3 times bigger. We have friends that also rent down here and who recently changed properties (2 months ago). Acquired a place within 2 weeks compared to 3 months initially.

    An assumption, I take it? I have a number of friends who made the mistake of investing in Mandurah years ago, when the train line extension was but a rumour. They lost, got out, and made a lot more in the Perth market. Those who stayed, lost further. Lessons learnt however so its not the end of the world. I was initially looking in all areas in WA for my next investment but pretty quickly ruled out Mandurah – however I believe itwill ride it out due to the baby boomers retirement/downsizing/coastal living requirements.

    F: A simplistic or amateurs view of a market.

    No offence taken. Try a happy pill! :)

    Profile photo of Karley12Karley12
    Participant
    @karley12
    Join Date: 2012
    Post Count: 4

    Thank you, simple!

    Profile photo of FreckleFreckle
    Blocked
    @freckle
    Join Date: 2012
    Post Count: 1,681

    You have my apology if I've misjudged you. New members jumping on the bandwagon and making supporting comments in favor of those with little or no credibility and who make silly and superfluous comments throws up the odd red light or two.

    I'm still not convinced but I'll give you have the benefit of doubt for the time being.

    Karley wrote:
    An assumption, I take it? I have a number of friends who made the mistake of investing in Mandurah years ago, when the train line extension was but a rumour

    I rarely make assumptions. The mistake was not investing in Mandurah but where they invested and their reasoning. There are some here (on this forum) who have done well in Mandurah over the last few years.

    Quote:
    quickly ruled out Mandurah – however I believe itwill ride it out due to the baby boomers retirement/downsizing/coastal living requirements.

    Again a simplistic view.

    Coastal requirements – you just described 90% of Australian towns

    downsizing – there's less downsizing than you think. It's a tiny percentage of Mandurah RE

    babyboomers retiring – coupled to the downsizing theory.

    The GFC and an impending economic recession will likely cause further financial damage to the over 55's. They will not be a sector that helps any area ride out a contraction.

    Profile photo of Karley12Karley12
    Participant
    @karley12
    Join Date: 2012
    Post Count: 4

    F: You have my apology if I've misjudged you. New members jumping on the bandwagon and making supporting comments in favor of those with little or no credibility and who make silly and superfluous comments throws up the odd red light or two.

    I'm still not convinced but I'll give you have the benefit of doubt for the time being.

    Lucky me ;) I am thick skinned and believe it or not, reasonably well-researched so I am not offended by you in fact; I understand your frustration at other posters. I have been watching this forum for a couple of years now and decided to jump in and state that I agreed with the 'sentiment' of a post, not its entirety.

    F: Again a simplistic view.

    Coastal requirements – you just described 90% of Australian towns

    Haha, ouch! By 'coastal requirements' – I'm sure you are aware that Mandurah is very different to Sorrento, for example. More accessible to a greater number of homes by foot/bicycle, less traffic and tourists etc. In the last twelve months I have known about 8 retiring couples or singles move there and naturally being interested in property I have grilled them on their reasons for moving. The slower pace on the coast came out as a big desirable, and also to top up their retirement funds by usually 250-350K after selling up and downsizing.

    Look forward to reading your future posts Freckle, genuinely. Have a great day :)

    Profile photo of FreckleFreckle
    Blocked
    @freckle
    Join Date: 2012
    Post Count: 1,681
    Karley12 wrote:

    Haha, ouch! By 'coastal requirements' – I'm sure you are aware that Mandurah is very different to Sorrento, for example. More accessible to a greater number of homes by foot/bicycle, less traffic and tourists etc. In the last twelve months I have known about 8 retiring couples or singles move there and naturally being interested in property I have grilled them on their reasons for moving. The slower pace on the coast came out as a big desirable, and also to top up their retirement funds by usually 250-350K after selling up and downsizing.

    I think you need to study the stats a little closer. Anecdotal evidence is always interesting but its ability to lead one astray can't be underestimated.

    http://tinyurl.com/nskltgn

    There's a pdf research white paper at the end of that url entitled "The Journey Begins" from the Super Industry.

    Some interesting figures

    Baby boomers for these stats where born between 1946 – 1965 and are aged between 47 and 66. Half the baby boomer generation is considered to have already retired.

    5.5 million baby boomers

    48% intend moving

    28% to downsize

    15% for a sea change and 13% for tree change

    So that's roughly 2.7 million x 28% over the next 20 years. Roughly 38,000 per year spread across Australia. WA has about 10.6% of Australia's population (2.3mill) of which about 1.9 mil live in Perth. So 38,000 drops to somewhere around 3500/ yr max who might move and only around 15% 1700 are looking for a sea change.

    So your anecdotal evidence that 8 retiring couples moved to Mandurah may well be the total bag.

    The problem with this data is that it's trying to predict the future based on intentions. A property market correction could skew the predictions in any direction. Included in the report but not in the above figures are those who will invariable have to still work because they underestimated their retirement needs.

    My understanding is that retirees will not materialise in sufficient numbers to influence the Mandurah market in any substantive way.

    Profile photo of Andrew_AAndrew_A
    Participant
    @andrew_a
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 392

    I think there are some key winners in the infrastructure stakes for Brisbane <10k CBD, follow the tunnels and busways, there's a few of them to watch these days.

    Also check the density ratios (strata property as a % of total housing stock), it's very high around some of the activity hubs in the town plan, I like stepping one suburb further out from the heavily developed hubs and looking there, have to be a little bit general as the Brisbane market is small and I'm allready facing far too much competition for my liking this year, wish it was 2012 actually.

    Profile photo of trickeymickeytrickeymickey
    Member
    @trickeymickey
    Join Date: 2012
    Post Count: 19

    I have signed a contract on an IP in North Lakes due to it's huge growth drivers. Whilst it's a Stockland master planned community that hasn't seen much CG over the last 10 years due to the land releases, they only have 1000 blocks left now, which is about 2 years worth at their rate of about 500 blocks per year. Complimenting Westfield North Lakes, the massive business infrastructure that's finally about to take place, includes Bunnings, (which is currently being built), Costco's first QLD store, Ikea's second Brisbane store and new cinemas. Hundreds of jobs are coming and with the new rail line due in 2016, North Lakes now has all the ingredients for growth. Vacancy rates have been at 1% and there are several distressed sales on offer where people have lost money, (going by property history), as the market is lower than post GFC when prices where higher. Whilst land values have decreased due to the continued land releases, my DD feels this has good potential and now is a good time to buy when the market is down. Time will tell….

    Profile photo of Richard TaylorRichard Taylor
    Participant
    @qlds007
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 11,992

    Trickey personally i wouldn't buy an IP in North Lakes but everyone to their own.

    I am with Andrew we are avoiding the immediate inner suburbs for clients and looking at the next layer out.

    As Darryl said it is starting to hot up and find you have to be quick to pick up a good deal.

    Cheers

    Yours in Finance

    Richard Taylor | Mortgage Broker helping investors build their wealth thru property
    http://www.mortgagecapitalaustralia.com.au
    Email Me | Phone Me

    0-40 Properties in a decade with a unencumbered portfolio value in excess of $40M. Ask me for a copy of my API Interview.

    Profile photo of jenni_nextplace.com.aujenni_nextplace.com.au
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    @jenni_nextplace.com.au
    Join Date: 2013
    Post Count: 36

    Not sure but there are some great buys around at the moment. 

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