All Topics / Value Adding / Alternatives for wall for glass splashback

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
  • Profile photo of miikemiike
    Participant
    @miike
    Join Date: 2008
    Post Count: 111

    Hi Guys,

    I am looking at having a glass splash back installed into my kitchen.
    The state of the wall is exposed brick (quite rough from old cement).

    As you cannot see behind the splash back, I am investigating my options.

    (1) Render Wall
    Problem: I have done basic plastering, not rendering

    (2) Cement sheeting, with cornice adhesive to hold the board
    Problem: Not sure if it will hold the board and the glass splash back weight.

    (3) Plaster the wall without cement using premix
    Problem: Could be quite expensive.

    I am looking at going with (2) or (3),

    Are there any other alternatives, is there any other concerns with the above options, will (2) work for what I am trying to achieve?

    Thanks for the help all!!!!

    Cheers,
    Miike

    Profile photo of maree_bradrossmaree_bradross
    Member
    @maree_bradross
    Join Date: 2007
    Post Count: 401

    My taste is I would like a clear glass splashback and be able to see the bricks – is that an option at all?

    Profile photo of miikemiike
    Participant
    @miike
    Join Date: 2008
    Post Count: 111

    The bricks would need a lot of work to have that done. It was something I thought as an option for asthetics, however the appartment is aimed at up-market trendy studio feel.

    Profile photo of maree_bradrossmaree_bradross
    Member
    @maree_bradross
    Join Date: 2007
    Post Count: 401

    rather than glass what about a brushed stainless steel sheet?

    Profile photo of miikemiike
    Participant
    @miike
    Join Date: 2008
    Post Count: 111

    I thought that would give a nice look, but it doesn't match well with my color scheme for the place

    floors, jatoba wood
    bench, ceaser stone – expresso
    cabinetry – white matte
    wall paint – antique us white

    not so easy, :( …at this stage leaning to a plain glass , no background, color or distortions

    Profile photo of sapphire101sapphire101
    Participant
    @sapphire101
    Join Date: 2006
    Post Count: 203

    Mirrors

    Cheaper than glass for splashbacks (the premium for these is high)
    Adds rooms to kitchen space
    Makes the granite tops look amazing
    You dont have to clean it

    Profile photo of sapphire101sapphire101
    Participant
    @sapphire101
    Join Date: 2006
    Post Count: 203

    If you are selling that is……….

    Profile photo of miikemiike
    Participant
    @miike
    Join Date: 2008
    Post Count: 111

    it's a buy, add value, rent and reinvest equity strategy for this property. Given the current climate, theres always a possibility of selling if it comes to that although highly unlikely.

    Mirrors is an interesting alternative to glass, i'll take a look around to see some examples.

    Profile photo of loccolocco
    Member
    @locco
    Join Date: 2007
    Post Count: 62

    maybe just cement bag the brickwork then glass splashback/mirror, just be aware that mirrore splashbacks look great but can be reasonably expensive.

    Profile photo of glen gglen g
    Member
    @glen-g
    Join Date: 2009
    Post Count: 9

    Hi Mike,
    I'd prob go with option 2.  The corice cement should hold but if you were still concerned you could also use nylon masonry plugs aswell.  Have you had any quotes for your glass splash back?  I was keen on glass for my splash back aswell but the cheapest price i could find was around $350 per M2 installed.  I'm going with tiles now for around a tenth of the price.
    Good luck
    Glen

    Profile photo of miikemiike
    Participant
    @miike
    Join Date: 2008
    Post Count: 111

    Hi Glen,

    Thanks for the reply.
    I went with option 2 and started the work over the weekend.
    Although the glass is more expensive, depending on the apartment and demographic, spending the extra can be worth it.

    Let you know how it goes.
    <br /:)” title=”>:)” class=”bbcode_smiley” />

    Profile photo of Scott No MatesScott No Mates
    Participant
    @scott-no-mates
    Join Date: 2005
    Post Count: 3,856

    I'd also go fibre cement sheet but depending upon how bad the brick work behind is, fix a few 20 x 40 timber battens @ 450 mm centres horizontally, fix with spaghetti and screws. Then use stud adhesive & plasterboard screws (predrill holes through the sheet). Cornice cement is probably not the best solution in wet areas (read the pack).

    Profile photo of danielodanielo
    Member
    @danielo
    Join Date: 2012
    Post Count: 1

    I would have gone with option 2 as well, I think it’s the best option.

    Profile photo of miikemiike
    Participant
    @miike
    Join Date: 2008
    Post Count: 111

    Old update,

    I did go with option 2.

    It has been up for 4 years now, was very easy to DIY and worked out quite cheap in the end.

    Still looks like new too.

    Cheers,
    Miike

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)

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