All Topics / Value Adding / Walls and Painting

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
  • Profile photo of miikemiike
    Participant
    @miike
    Join Date: 2008
    Post Count: 111

    Hi Guys,

    Quick question.

    My interior walls are plastered brick and painted. Some are peeling and extremely stained, practically untouched sine the early 80's.
    I am about to start redoing all of these walls at present.

    I have come up with the following plan:
    1. Sand all paint back to plaster.
    2. Patch and fill nail/screw holes with spackling compound.
    3. Patch and fill cracks with caulk.
    4. Wash all surfaces with TSP (trisodium phosphate) to remove grease and dirt.
    5. Rinse all surfaces well to remove TSP.
    6. Dry, dust and vacuum all surfaces.
    7. Start painting process.

    My questions are:
    1. What sanding equipment should I be using, i.e sandbelt, orbital, etc.
    2. Is there any changes you would recommend to my plan?

    Cheers,
    miike

    Profile photo of crashycrashy
    Participant
    @crashy
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 736

    sanding paint? try paintstripper. The paint probably contains LEAD, best to leave it alone.

    what about just covering it all with 3mm laminated MDF?

    Profile photo of miikemiike
    Participant
    @miike
    Join Date: 2008
    Post Count: 111

    Hi Crashy,

    From my undestanding lead paints were abolished in Victoria in 78.
    I'll get a lead testing kit and make sure the paint is not lead based.

    The paint is peeling on some walls, cracking on others and extremely stained too.
    Needs to be replaces,

    Hadn't thought about laminated mdf, will investigate it a bit further.

    Cheers,
    miike

    Profile photo of crashycrashy
    Participant
    @crashy
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 736

    A painter told me the most common reason for peeling paint was putting non-lead paint over the top of lead paint. the two dont bond well.

    from memory  3mm MDF is about $12 for a 2400×1200 sheet.

    sanding sounds like one of those jobs you could waste weeks on & not get a cent extra……

    Profile photo of miikemiike
    Participant
    @miike
    Join Date: 2008
    Post Count: 111

    Thanks for the tip Crashy,

    Going to head down to Bunnings for a look around tonite. :)

    Cheers,
    Miike

    Profile photo of Scott No MatesScott No Mates
    Participant
    @scott-no-mates
    Join Date: 2005
    Post Count: 3,856

    Firstly, why take it back to bare render? Once you have stripped off the paint (WAFMAT) why do you need to wash off the grease?

    Light sand with sandpaper on a broom handle/pad, heavier to remove any loose material. Sugar soap to remove dust/grease etc. Patch & sand. Paint with compatible paint. Buy a few drop sheets (yeah the real heavy ones), buy some disposable masks, decent brushes/rollers as required – the cheaper ones lose their nap or bristles quite quickly.

    Profile photo of crashycrashy
    Participant
    @crashy
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 736

    depends on the extent of the peeling. you need to get ALL of the paint off.

    Put paint stripper on any cracked paint, but make sure you scrape it off fairly quick, or it loses its bubbles & kinda glues itself back on. Paint stripper only works when the chemical can get behind the paint, through cracks etc. otherwise it does nothing.

    Try an angle grinder flap sander wheel if a belt sander fails. Orbitals are a waste of time.

    Water blaster works well but probly not practical in this situation.

    If you cant get all the paint off, heres a little trick. Buy a filler from Bunnings (forget the name, but it was red & white pot with blue & white speckle filler, made in Norway or somewhere, expensive stuff). add a bit of water, paint it on the whole area. let it dry, then sand smooth. saved me weeks!

    Profile photo of AnrobelAnrobel
    Participant
    @anrobel
    Join Date: 2007
    Post Count: 33

    Hi Miike,

    I've just painted over a similarly messy living area (ceiling was painted with a high gloss beige enamel..YUK), I gave it all a really good clean with sugarsoap, for the peeling areas i sanded back until it wasn't peeling anymore ran a heap of spakfilla over the area – sanded back to even up with the existing old paint. Then used a product called ESP (Easy Surface Prep) from Bunnings its as simple as wiping it on then wiping the excess off, let it sit for 90 mins then plain old ceiling white will bond to 10 year old high gloss enamel – was a lot easier than deglossing the whole area! Good luck.

    Profile photo of miikemiike
    Participant
    @miike
    Join Date: 2008
    Post Count: 111

    Thanks Anrobel,

    After doing my research i've decided to do the following and started this today.

    For paint preperation only:
    1. Sand back all peeling paint.
    2. Clean all walls and ceilings with sugar soap.
    3. Fill all cracks with Filler.
    4. For all uneven paint areas due to pealing use Skim Coat Filler.

    Will be doing some other tasks prior to painting, will depending on existing paint be using a primer.

    Cheers for all the assistance guys,

    Will try and get some photos, etc up on the net soon with my reno, :)

    Miike

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic. If you don't have an account, you can register here.