All Topics / Help Needed! / Colourbond vs Tile roof

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  • Profile photo of vernonvernon
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    @vernon
    Join Date: 2005
    Post Count: 33

    Hi everyone,

    Can anyone tell me what are the advantages a colourbond roof has over a tile roof? Which is more durable?

    Thanks

    Profile photo of XeniaXenia
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    @xenia
    Join Date: 2002
    Post Count: 1,231

    I would like to know the answer to this too. I always thought that a tiled roof is better quality. However, we have found that houses tend to sell well with colourbond roofs as that’s what the market wants!!!!!!

    then again, I personally hate rendered houses, I think brick is much better, but again, who am I to argue with the market???

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    Profile photo of DazzlingDazzling
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    @dazzling
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    I reckon the colourbond roof is the go.

    Much lighter than tiles (I read 3 times lighter, but I reckon it’d be more like 5 or 6 times lighter).
    Rafters can be slimmer, supporting less weight.
    If you get white ants eating your rafters, there won’t be an enormous disaster with massive weight falling in around you.
    No need for batons to hang the tiles off.
    Much quicker to install…hence cheaper.
    Better security. Tradies especially, but anyone worth there salt can very quickly remove tiles and enter the house via the manhole.
    Colourbond doesn’t crack if tradesman step on the wrong bit of the tile.
    Better water tightness – IMO – not as many cracks everywhere. Rectangular sheets of colourbond can be enormous.
    Capital cost per sqm is alot lower.

    That’ll do….it wins hands down IMO.

    Durability….probably tiles but then I don’t think colourbond has been around long enough to have the runs on the board. Corrugated iron has obviously and there is no comparison…hence why they invented colourbond to compete.

    My mentor exclusively installs colourbond on all his developments. You pay buku extra if you want tiles….but then more expense is not necessarily better. Just a recognition that it’s more expensive to produce and install tiles. He sells after developing, so durability isn’t a large concern. Cheap, quick, looks good and does the job are his main criteria.

    Looking at the ‘market’, I reckon the developers have chosen the colourbond roof as the go for all of the above criteria and hence made the decision for the market, and spun / marketed it in such a way as to be more attractive. They’ll do the tiled roof for you if specifically requested, but I’d say you’ll be forking out for a hefty premium.

    Cheers,

    Darryl Moore

    “No point having a cake if you can’t eat it.”

    Profile photo of asdfasdf
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    @asdf
    Join Date: 2005
    Post Count: 139

    Thanks for that in depth explanation. I had always thought Colorbond was MORE expensive than tiles. Well, thats what the Project home Sales Reps tell me anyway and that, “For you, its free…” yada yada.. Some houses do look better in Colorbond than tiles but I suppose tiles will never age in style. Or will it?? Perhaps it depends on what state you’re in?

    Profile photo of AmandaBSAmandaBS
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    @amandabs
    Join Date: 2005
    Post Count: 549

    Being from Qld I don’t think you can go past a timber and tin house on stumps!!
    Check out http://www.colorbond.com.au for ideas.
    A Colorbond roof has less weight than a tile roof. Avoid the dark colours as they do fade.
    Amanda

    Profile photo of ShwingShwing
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    @shwing
    Join Date: 2005
    Post Count: 219

    I agree with Dazzling for the most part, with a couple of exceptions.
    1. If you are in a house with cathidral ceilings, go the tiles, they are much quiter in heavy rain, as you have no roof caverty to absorb most of the sound.
    2. If you live in a bushy area or will have trees overhanging the roof. Colorbond stains and very noticably, especially from tree sap and general build up of dirt.
    3. Colorbond roofing is extremely slippery when wet, and a real pain in the as5 if you slip over, those bolts really hurt (although I imagine not as much as the 30ft drop from my roof).

    Mal

    Getting out of your comfort zone, can help you become comfortable

    Profile photo of redwingredwing
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    @redwing
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 2,733
    Originally posted by Dazzling:

    I reckon the colourbond roof is the go.

    Much lighter than tiles (I read 3 times lighter, but I reckon it’d be more like 5 or 6 times lighter).
    Rafters can be slimmer, supporting less weight.
    If you get white ants eating your rafters, there won’t be an enormous disaster with massive weight falling in around you.
    No need for batons to hang the tiles off.
    Much quicker to install…hence cheaper.
    Better security. Tradies especially, but anyone worth there salt can very quickly remove tiles and enter the house via the manhole.Colourbond doesn’t crack if tradesman step on the wrong bit of the tile.
    Better water tightness – IMO – not as many cracks everywhere. Rectangular sheets of colourbond can be enormous.
    Capital cost per sqm is alot lower.

    That’ll do….it wins hands down IMO.

    Durability….probably tiles but then I don’t think colourbond has been around long enough to have the runs on the board. Corrugated iron has obviously and there is no comparison…hence why they invented colourbond to compete.

    My mentor exclusively installs colourbond on all his developments. You pay buku extra if you want tiles….but then more expense is not necessarily better. Just a recognition that it’s more expensive to produce and install tiles. He sells after developing, so durability isn’t a large concern. Cheap, quick, looks good and does the job are his main criteria.

    Looking at the ‘market’, I reckon the developers have chosen the colourbond roof as the go for all of the above criteria and hence made the decision for the market, and spun / marketed it in such a way as to be more attractive. They’ll do the tiled roof for you if specifically requested, but I’d say you’ll be forking out for a hefty premium.

    Cheers,

    Darryl Moore

    “No point having a cake if you can’t eat it.”

    I agree with Dazzlings Post..

    However,the house we are in ATM has “glazed” roof tiles, even though they are about 15 odd years old they look ‘brand new’..

    I was more used to having colourbond roofs (actually colourbond walls as well) being born in the north of WA.

    One day in Perth, my 2 1/2 yr old son locked me out of the house (tiled roof)house keys and car keys inside and the spare key was an hour away, meanwhile he was going *spare* inside the house..

    I rang a friend who told me only every 3rd tile is actually held down and to get in as Dazzling suggested……IT TOOK ME ABOUT 60 SECONDSand that included getting up on the roof.

    The alarm systems on any tiled roof IP’s now have hidden reed switches at the manhole covers..and on any glass sliding doors, the cost is minimal when installing the system and you have piece of mind..

    My vote is for colourbond…watch out for the thief that carries a battery operated drill though doesnt take much to pull out some tek screws..[fear]

    PLUS the sound of rain on a tin roof ‘lulls’ me to sleep…[sleepy2]

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    Profile photo of roborobo
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    @robo
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 155

    We are doing c/bond on our new ppor, for cost though on our home it was more than tiles, it will depend on the design of the home, c/bond is a better finish it is tied in to the structure of the home and not a dead weight like tiles, we will be having a foil blanket under the iron and R2 bats all through ceilings. Lighter colours are better for insulation. Steel prices keep going up every couple of months.If you are doing tiles teracotta look better than cement. I couldn’t talk my wife into brick and tile, had to be c/bond and render. More $$$$$$$$$$
    Robo

    Profile photo of vernonvernon
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    @vernon
    Join Date: 2005
    Post Count: 33

    During periods of heavy rain, is colourbond roofing more noisy than tile?

    If so, then are there any options to install some noise insulation material in the colourbond roofing so that the noise can be reduced?

    Thanks!

    Profile photo of Mortgage HunterMortgage Hunter
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    @mortgage-hunter
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 3,781

    I was wondering about thermal qualities of colourbond? But with the foil underlay and insulation it is prob similar?

    As a kid we had a tin roof – we all loved the noise from the rain – even my daughter today has commented on it.

    Cheers,

    Simon Macks
    Residential and Commercial Finance Broker
    ***NODOC @ 7.15% to 70% LVR***
    [email protected]
    0425 228 985

    Comments may not be relevant to individual circumstances. If you intend making any investment, financial or taxation decision you should consult a professional adviser.

    Profile photo of Richard TaylorRichard Taylor
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    @qlds007
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 12,024

    Coming from the UK I have always been a brick and tile man.

    In saying that I built our home 2 years ago in the Western suburbs of Brissie and it 68 squares so has a large roof span.

    Went the colourbond route and never regret a moment. Nothing nicer than hearing the sound of rain on a roof although admitedly the damage tree branches do can be an issue.

    Cheers Richard

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    Profile photo of AUSPROPAUSPROP
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    @ausprop
    Join Date: 2003
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    the builders I have dealt with price zincalume and concrete tiles the same. then clay tiles are a bit dearer, then colorbond dearer again.



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    Profile photo of Mortgage HunterMortgage Hunter
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    @mortgage-hunter
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 3,781

    I have heard that the bulk buying ability of major builders sees tiles the cheapest.

    Is this the same with smaller builders?

    Cheers,

    Simon Macks
    Residential and Commercial Finance Broker
    ***NODOC @ 7.15% to 70% LVR***
    [email protected]
    0425 228 985

    Comments may not be relevant to individual circumstances. If you intend making any investment, financial or taxation decision you should consult a professional adviser.

    Profile photo of waynel2waynel2
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    @waynel2
    Join Date: 2004
    Post Count: 311

    g’day all,

    I would actually favor tiles over colourbond.

    I lived in my parent’s house for a while and they have a colourbond roof.

    We would constantly get woken up with the rain hitting the roof. We would also have to turn up the TV when it rained!

    Colourbond isn’t good for installing air con units either, as instead of removing a couple of tiles for the unit; they have to cut a hole through the colourbond sheeting. When getting air con quotes this was one of the things they asked, as I think they charge a little more for colourbond installations.

    Also if you’re into renos, or running additional powerpoints and telephone points tiles make it much an easier job to run the cables. You can simply push back a tile that’s above the power point and drop a cable down, instead of having to crawl through the cobweb infested roof.

    Saying that though, I do like the look of some of the new colourbond roofs – though for my next house I’m choosing tiles over colourbond.

    The builders we have been speaking to, actually charge more for tiles – with colourbond being the cheaper alternative.

    Anyway, back to work!:)

    Wayne Leech

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    Profile photo of DazzlingDazzling
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    @dazzling
    Join Date: 2005
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    I’m finding it curious that a few people are saying their builders are quoting them more for colorbond and a few others are saying their builders are quoting them more for tiles ?? It’s obviously not that simple…like most things in life.

    Having never gone through the process of building a new house, it’s all hearsay for me.

    My main criteria would be to choose a roofing product that gave the best chance of keeping the water off the dwelling. I find more and more that if I look after the roof and stop the ingress of water, the roof will look after the rest of the house. I’m finding rectifying the problems caused by the ingress of water are the most costly, both from a time and cost point of view.

    When buying an existing building, the roof, it’s material and condition receive a lot of attention.

    Does anyone know roughly what the weight factor between colorbond and tiles typically is.

    Another thing, having cleaned my fair share of gutters, I find colorbond or similar is excellent for the “non gutter” approach. Don’t know if this is allowed in new constructions…probably not…but this works well and avoids the whole downpipes clogging / leaves thing. Just on that…why is it when you check out the downpipe location, it’s always at the highest point of the gutter ??

    I’m learning heaps with this thread. Good on everyone for contributing.

    Cheers,

    Darryl Moore

    “No point having a cake if you can’t eat it.”

    Profile photo of TeacherK6TeacherK6
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    @teacherk6
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 164

    Re cost of colorbond vs tiles.

    Parents r putting in building aplication now for a 40sq 2 story house in semi rural area with a major builder. the steel was 5 grand more then the tiles…

    Jason :)

    Profile photo of PurpleKissPurpleKiss
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    @purplekiss
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 580

    We have a colourbond roof and it’s great, but yes, you do hear the rain more if it’s a heavy shower. Personally i like the sound but you may have to turn the TV up if you get an exceptionally heavy shower. It’s not that often that you need to though.

    We weren’t charged more for installing the air con on the roof. But the TV antenna guy was grumbling about getting the antenna down the wall cavity as he couldn’t just lift tiles. He tryied form the inside of the roof first but when he could succeed he did undo the tec scress and lift the tin to get it down and then rescrewed it afterwards so it can be lifted if absolutley necessary.

    As for termal warmth etc, I havn’et ntoticed any difference between this home and others I’ve lived in that were tile. We have always had insulation in the roof of every house we’ve lived in.

    We are in the bush and haven’t noticed any staining on the roof to date although will watch that now that it’s mentioned above. i have to wonder why you’d have trees so close as to drop sap on the roof though, if nothing else it’s a major fire hazard and if you’re living in the bush you need to consider that as well. Have a bit of space between you and the trees regardless of the type of roof.

    Colourbond is more secure than tiles, although it can be lifted if someone was really desperate to get in.

    HAve fun choosing.
    PK

    Profile photo of roborobo
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    @robo
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 155

    Our new home is 40 sq on one level and c/bond was 4,500 more than cement tiles.
    It depends on the style of the house some homes would not suit a tiled roof. One thing with c/bond if you get hail big enough it will pit the steel and it will rust. The last big hail storm in Armidale nearly every c/bond roof in town was replaced, then tiles will smash and let water in.
    With the new energy regs we have anticon blanket under iron and r2 batts all through ceilings.
    Council also slapped a level 1 bushfire prone area on us, we are in suburbia and the nearest tree is 150m away.
    1.Weephole formers with spark arrestor on all grates to brickwork $150
    2. S/Steel mesh to all windows and security and sliding doors $1300
    3.Metal gutter guard and metal valley protection $3,000
    Robo[comp]

    Profile photo of vernonvernon
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    @vernon
    Join Date: 2005
    Post Count: 33

    Is changing a colourbond roof more simple and quicker than changing a tile roof? From the posts, it seems that a colourbond roof can be lifted off and a new one bolted on if there is a need to change.

    Thanks

    Profile photo of andrewff1@aapt.net.au[email protected]
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    @andrewff1-aapt.net.au
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    Post Count: 5

    In my past life (Home Improvements Business) I installed thousands sq. metres of colorbond (never tiles – never asked!).

    From the point of view of LABOUR, c/bond comes up trumps – quicker to instal as new or replacement roof, easier to do a repair job (one sheet out, one sheet in), and if the installer is any good, it LOOKS fantastic when it’s finished.

    As for noise in the rain, and radiated heat, isn’t EVERY roof these days insulated? R2.0 or R3.0 batts will kill the sound of the rain, and will definitely kill radiated heat through your ceilings.

    I agree about colour as mentioned earlier – light colours are better for reflecting some of the heat.

    And what kind of a tradesman instals a roof gutter that slopes UP to the downpipe??? Anyone worth their weight in sparrow poop would set the gutter to slope slightly DOWN to where the customer wanted his/her downpipes!

    Keep on truckin’, folks. I’m really enjoying the chatter.

    Andrew Ogilvie

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