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  • Profile photo of Fast LaneFast Lane
    Member
    @fast-lane
    Join Date: 2004
    Post Count: 527

    I was contemplating doing a Diploma of Business. It would be finished by the end of the year at night school however, it seems pretty watered down.

    The subjects seem to be generic without any substance. It doesn’t touch on things like accounting, marketing or economics etc. and I was wondering is a diploma still a diploma, it’s nationally recognised and accredited, but because of its content and short timeframe to complete, I’m wondering if I’d be wasting my time?

    So basically I’m wondering would it still be regarded in the same light as another diploma of business that was more involved and took longer to complete?

    Please reply quickly as the deal would be going down very, very shortly…Thanks, G7

    Profile photo of JayJay
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    @jay
    Join Date: 2004
    Post Count: 59

    Regarded by whom?

    Are you doing it for the knowledge you acquire, or for the additional prestige the diploma might give you in a job application?

    Whether completing it is worthwhile or not depends entirely on your reason for beginning it in the first place [grad]

    Jay

    Profile photo of ANUBISANUBIS
    Participant
    @anubis
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 559

    Diploma’s are fairly low on the prestige factor – right up there with certificates. You may be better off biting the bullet and doing a Bach of Business.

    Being enrolled is quite often as good as having it finished. It’s more about the ability to undertake the work and learning new ways to approach things than the grade.

    Profile photo of Robbie BRobbie B
    Member
    @robbie-b
    Join Date: 2004
    Post Count: 2,493

    Come on Anubis, I know people who enrol and get less than 10% as a mark. They are certainly not showing any ability. I think you get 10% for writing your name so they must have got that wrong!

    The Mortgage Adviser


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    Profile photo of ANUBISANUBIS
    Participant
    @anubis
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 559

    yes passing helps [grad] but distinctions are not reqd.

    Profile photo of Robbie BRobbie B
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    @robbie-b
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    Profile photo of quigglesquiggles
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    @quiggles
    Join Date: 2002
    Post Count: 98

    Going back to the original question, if the course seems empty to you, are you then not wasting your time? Can you find a similar course which touches on the areas that do interest you?

    You could approach it by asking if having the diploma will benefit you and the money and time cost is not excessive.

    Profile photo of Robbie BRobbie B
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    @robbie-b
    Join Date: 2004
    Post Count: 2,493

    If it seems empty, don’t do it. Seek another course or a higher level. Not much too it really.

    The Mortgage Adviser


    http://www.themortgageadviser.com.au
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    Profile photo of Fast LaneFast Lane
    Member
    @fast-lane
    Join Date: 2004
    Post Count: 527

    Thanks for all the responses guys, it’s a hard decision whether to go ahead or not and I still haven’t made it yet (and time’s running out!).

    Here’s a quick rundown on what’s on offer;

    -manage meetings
    -manage HR consultancy
    -manage operational plan
    -ensure a safe workplace
    -manage people performance
    -manage stress
    -prepare and manage budgets and financial plans and,
    -analyse and present research information.

    It just seems a bit ‘wishy-washy’ and sounds too generic to have any real value. However having a DipBus. beside my name could open doors that are currently shut.

    I’m probably irritating people now, but what do you think?

    Profile photo of quigglesquiggles
    Member
    @quiggles
    Join Date: 2002
    Post Count: 98

    This is going to sound rude.

    If you are doing the course solely to impress, professionally or otherwise, you have rocks in your head. It will not work.

    Only ever, EVER, do a course that you have belief and faith in or it will be a millstone while you are doing it and useless thereafter.

    I speak from experience.

    Profile photo of Robbie BRobbie B
    Member
    @robbie-b
    Join Date: 2004
    Post Count: 2,493

    What experience would that be?

    Any course that relates to a particular field is looked on favouably by an employer. Also, many courses are looked on favourably just because they show committment to education and self-improvement.

    Why would you not do courses to gain a professional advantage? It is exactly why most people do them!

    The Mortgage Adviser


    http://www.themortgageadviser.com.au
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    Profile photo of C2C2
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    @c2
    Join Date: 2002
    Post Count: 518

    Hi g7,

    One advantage of doing the course is that it allows you to see if you have what it takes to embark on further studies. It is a big jump from a diploma to a degree and if you haven’t done any study for a while then it would be a good way to test the waters.

    C2

    Profile photo of neo25x5neo25x5
    Member
    @neo25x5
    Join Date: 2005
    Post Count: 166

    I think it also depends on what you want to do. Those skills that you mentioned are applicable to most businesses but given that in a diploma you generally only skim through the work, its probably more suitable if youre working in a small business environment. I went through the same decision a couple of years ago and decided to go the whole hog to do a Masters of Business Administration (MBA). An MBA is definitely NOT watered down education!

    Profile photo of ANUBISANUBIS
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    @anubis
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 559

    You will get sweet FA respect for a diploma in business if you are trying for a corporate job. If you do it for skills for your own business then maybe.

    Those courses you mentioned just sound like the basics for very junior staff. Just not seeing value in the corporate world.

    Profile photo of hmackayhmackay
    Participant
    @hmackay
    Join Date: 2004
    Post Count: 197

    No info on your age, education or work experience to advise you on this course.

    But any extra education should be beneficial in the longrun.

    If you are concerned about low esteem associated with a Dip then perhaps you could do ,if you have the prerequisites, Graduate Diploma.

    To check on the usefullness of this course you could contact some head hunting firms.

    hrm

    Profile photo of Still in SchoolStill in School
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    @still-in-school
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 1,844

    diplomas, arent as strong meaning as they used to be, at some tafes or private colleges, how they grade passing in a subject, is being competent or non-competent in a module or the subject being studied

    but my honest opinion would be, if you are looking to further your studies later on, to go to university, doing a diploma, can get you into that university degree, but also allow you, or enable you, in not having to do first year university.. but hopefully, jump straight into 2nd year, after the diploma is completed.

    *** not only that its, a cheaper option too, if a diplomas, cost a few 100’s – 1000’s dollars where a a first year degree can cost you $10,000’s of dollar…

    Cheers,
    sis

    Wanna Talk About Stocks

    Profile photo of kay henrykay henry
    Member
    @kay-henry
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 2,737

    sis,

    Unfortunately, my experience in what you’ve stated is different. I am in the educational field, and have seen many students do a TAFe course, in Business, for example, get advanced standing/exemptions for 1 year of uni, then go to uni and fail all their second year subjects- because Accounting (for example) is taught at a very different level at TAFE than it is in University. also, some TAFE students left school early, did not complete maths at a high level, do ok at TAFE, but really don’t manage the maths components of subjects that have the expectation that students have completed maths up to 3 unit level. Ther former TAFE student will also be sitting in with students who have done levels up to 4 Unit maths- it can be a real struggle.

    I wish it were true that students could do a Diploma at TAFe and then easily adjust to second year University, but particularly for the technical subjects, the outcomes can be poor.

    kay henry

    Profile photo of gatsbygatsby
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    @gatsby
    Join Date: 2003
    Post Count: 708

    I completed my year 12 at RMIT and studied English Literature as part of the course. I scored the highest over all students at the end of the year. Then I went on to study Drama/English Literature at Rusden (now merged with Monash?). Boy when I studied English Literature then, was I in for a shock! I never failed though and only received a pass. (no High Distinctions except for Creative Writing component). So for me, yes there is a huge difference between TAFE and University. I then went on to do a Bachelor of Applied Science and boy, once again, was I in for another shock (but did pass)! I think IMHO that Tafe is great if it specialises in ‘EXACTLY’ what you want to do in life, however the assessment criteria is in no way comparably demanding as a University degree. Each to their own.
    Cheers,
    Gatsby.

    “Sometimes the hardest thing to do in life is often the best thing to do.”

    Profile photo of hellmanhellman
    Member
    @hellman
    Join Date: 2005
    Post Count: 109

    Gatsby is right!

    If you are using a diploma to get into biz make sure your maths is at a very high level. Unless you did ‘advanced’ (or 3/4 Unit) maths you will find it extremly difficult.

    I for one find it confusing as to why such a high maths level is req. for business (such as augmented coefficent matrixs, indefinite Integrals, Intergral Claculus, Maxima/Minima, etc). I never have used any of these and I’m guessing – T never, ever will…

    For a job employers would look at it and give some credit towards it (i.e. self education) but in my opinon I don’t think it would massively increase your chanes that much – rather do courses that interest you, and where you will be going (so if you want to work in HRM, do lots of courses that focus on HRM, for example – this will give you more credit that just having a biz diploma).

    Hellman

    Profile photo of Robbie BRobbie B
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    @robbie-b
    Join Date: 2004
    Post Count: 2,493

    Advanced mathematics has nothing to do with business. I did 3 and 4 unit maths in high school and have been in business for years. I have never used any of the advanced formulas. Everything I have used was learned at the 2 unit level or lower.

    Specialist formulas are certainly used for such things as calculating repayments, various ratios, etc, but this has nothing to do with working in business. These are for specialised fields.

    TMA


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