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  • Profile photo of Robbie BRobbie B
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    @robbie-b
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    I am extremely disappointed with something I heard on the news today and hope it is just media hype…

    Apparently, many Australians are now seeking refunds of money provided as donations to Tsunami victims in Indonesia as a result of Schappelle Corby’s conviction yesterday.

    There is also a call for a boycott of all tourism and travel to Indonesia.

    I have been to Bali, Indonesia and found the people there to be fantastic. They are a poor people who maintain a strong spirit. I was there prior to Megawati winning the election and was impressed by their strong beliefs and political passion.

    With their poor infrastructure and high unemployment, they do not have much, After the Tsunami, their economy will be stretched a lot further. They are very dependent on tourism dollars especially in Bali.

    I cannot see how the conviction of one person (who may really be guilty) could result in so many Aussies being so harsh and irrational regarding the whole country. I hope those reading this will not follow the same path as there are a lot of people there that need our help and they are less fortunate than us.

    The Mortgage Adviser


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    Profile photo of wealth4life.comwealth4life.com
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    @wealth4life.com
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    I call this the “flockers” and i hope she is not really guilty either.

    Darren Hinch did make a point last week when he said that her bag would have been three times bigger!!! oh yes thats mine … hope not.

    resi

    Profile photo of Leo ChekhovLeo Chekhov
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    @leo-chekhov
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    They don’t really mean it. It’s just a heat of the moment reaction, that’s all.

    Leo

    Profile photo of DDDD
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    @dd
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    Well how well did they consider the possibility that her gear was tampered with. The baggage handler fiasco in Sydney would have been enough for me to vote not guilty.

    They had Aussie Feds assist them in catching the Bali 9 so let the poor girl go. Bang the rest of them up for as long as you like but this ones a bad call.

    If Qantas,Virgin and others banned flights for 3 months, how quickly would she be home. Sure the Indonesians want to save face, but this smacks of pig headedness and sending a message. 20 years is madness if she is innocent and im pretty sure she is.

    Do the trade and transport boycotts, leave the Tsunami money alone as thats a separate issue. Leaving her to rot over there is not right. She has not recieved the benifit of the doubt so lets all pitch in and not sit on the fence out there.

    Have your say here as we still live in a free country.

    DD

    Buyers Agent (Dip Financial Services(FP)
    Don’t sweat the small stuff,and it’s all small stuff!!

    Profile photo of Robbie BRobbie B
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    @robbie-b
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    They do not get the benefit of the doubt in Indo. It is an inquisitorial system whereby you are presumed guilty until you prove your innocence. Just because we use a different system does not make theirs wrong. She was clearly poorly represented in my opinion and damaged her own chances by playing it out in the media and did not prove her innocence beyond any reasonable doubt. This would have never happened in an Australian Court.

    Maybe she will take up the offer of propert representation this time around and get off on appeal.

    The Mortgage Adviser


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    Profile photo of ANUBISANUBIS
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    @anubis
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    Sorry DD, but no-one I’ve talked to thinks she is innocent.

    We can’t enforce our rules and regulations on another country without invading them. Indonesia is a sovereign nation as far as I know and they are free to set whatever penalties they like for crime just as we are.

    I think she was lucky she wasn’t sentenced to death – probably due to the Australian chest beating over the latest cause du jour.

    Profile photo of jhopperjhopper
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    @jhopper
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    Personally, I think the Indonesians have the right approach. Anyone considering drug trafficking at least knows what the repurcussions are and cannot be deluded that they “didn’t know”. It was certainly a tough sentence although could have been tougher. I may not be a saint but I know if I do something wrong, I have a chance of paying for it.

    Not going to argue about whether or not she was innocent because I doubt many people actually know the truth, I know I wouldn’t have a clue.

    As for the refund on Tsunami aid, give me a break. The people of Indonesia deserve and require as much aid and sympathy as possible.

    Profile photo of gatsbygatsby
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    @gatsby
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    I have my own convictions which mirror those of many Australians about this issue. However I think making ‘someone’ (Tsunami sufferers) an example and scapegoat as a result of our belief is almost a parallel of what I believe resulted in Chappelle’s verdict? After all, it was a round world last time I looked?
    Gatsby.

    Profile photo of fostonfoston
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    @foston
    Join Date: 2003
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    After listening to and reading all the fors and againsts and all the media hype etc etc, i find i can not say to myself whether i think she is 100% guilty or innocent.I do believe she was let down by her defence team and the Australian authorities and if she is innocent a terrible injustice has occured.My first reaction was, along with thousands of others, to want to hurt this country as much as possible by financial means by boycotts etc. After thinking about the situation i have changed my mind on this as i believe this action will not help her cause any at all and will only cause much hardship for people who have no say in this matter at all , Aussies who have business’s there included.Wanting donations for the tsunami disaster back is a sad reflection on us all as decent Australians as this is a totally separate issue.

    Foston

    Life is a series of new beginnings

    Profile photo of pelicanpelican
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    @pelican
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    I think most of us have to remember we were not privy to the actual court proceedings, and only heard what was fed by emotional outbursts….

    I feel bad for Schapelle, and, there is much that does not make sense…. Yes I would like to see her home, but the fact remains, this was tried in the media…

    ABOVE ALL we must respect the sovereignty of other countries and their justice systems… As Australians this time, we have been a disgrace….. This is not the way to help Ms. Corby…..

    Hopefully with some better lawyers and a review of the evidence and facts, she may be able to come home soon…. possibly found innocent…..

    There is just way too much emotion to this case….. which makes many simply look like bigots……

    Profile photo of redwingredwing
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    @redwing
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    I believe there are over 100 Australians held on drug related crimes in various countries around the world?

    David HICKS is still held without being charged?

    Other Aussies in jail at the same time as Chapelle are now out ( 1 for Exctasy and the other for firearms on his boat) did the Media attention help or Hinder Chapelle’s fight???

    If Chapelle looked like some scruffy, dreadlocked, nose pierced hippie guy with a goatie and one tooth..would the attention and sympathy be as high..no matter what the guilt??

    These are things that run through my head regarding the incident..

    Last time i was over there for a wedding we got hit up by Bali customs for’duty’ on our bottles of wine (gift wrapped great OZ wine and explained as gifts for the wedding) they wouldn’t wear it and we were taken to a seperate room, wherein the duty was explained ($25 each..bargained to $15) and then let out the side gate.

    A friend the day before was hit up for $50 for the wine (again gift wrapped as gifts for the wedding..TIP dont bother next time no matter what the Travel Agent says about avoiding payment)

    as for Bali, enjoyed it untill 4 of us got Salmonella on the last day[puke]

    “Money is a currency, like electricity and it requires momentum to make it Effective”
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    Profile photo of redwingredwing
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    @redwing
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    Also when i was in BALI the economy had suffered from the bombing immensely; i agree with not boycotting the area..Indonesia as a whole wouldn’t care and i’d hate to be in Schappele’s shoes in Jail after that course of action..

    [weird]

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    Profile photo of jhopperjhopper
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    @jhopper
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    What gets me is a paedophile was sentenced yesterday to 12 months in prison (off in 4 months!!)here in Australia but Schapelle got 20 years in Indo for drugs.

    Personally, I think Australia could learn a thing or two about sending a clear message.

    Profile photo of xxxxxx
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    @xxx
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    Taken from http://www.heraldsun.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5478,15470184%255E25717,00.html

    AND now to the verdict on the Schapelle Corby case. I find the defendant guilty of xenophobia, spite, boorishness and a self-righteous tribal hysteria.

    No, I don’t mean Corby.

    I’m referring to the weeping and bellowing mob that is demanding we do all it takes — even starve the poorest Indonesians — to free this convicted drug trafficker. “Our” Schapelle.

    What a shock to see the beast of mob rule roar like this, and in support of a woman who seems on the evidence more likely to be guilty than she’s painted.

    Yes, Corby may be as innocent as she says. But picture how she must look, and how we all now look, to an Indonesian, whether a judge or a citizen.

    Here is a surfer girl who worked as a bar hostess in Tokyo’s nightclub area, flying into Bali for reportedly the fifth time in six years.

    (Corby, a student beautician who’d scraped up cash from working at a fish-and-chip shop, told 60 Minutes she’d been to Bali “five or six times since I was 16”.)

    Customs officials screen her bags and detect something suspicious. They watch her, and later tell a court she seems nervous. Her bodyboard bag is more than twice its usual weight, bulging with an extra something the size of a stuffed pillow.

    Actually, she says later, she’d only dragged her bag, and had so much other luggage she couldn’t tell its weight was unusual, or that there was anything inside but a bodyboard and flippers. Yes, well.

    Two police and two customs officials agree on what happened next. They say Corby’s brother James carried the bag for her to the customs area, where officer I Gusti Nyoman Winata asked her to open it.

    Corby zipped open the front pocket. Now the main zip, demanded Winata.

    “The suspect (seemed) to panic,” he later testified.

    “When I opened the bag a little bit, she stopped me and said, ‘No!’

    “I asked why. She answered, ‘I have some . . .’ She looked confused.”

    ABC’s Lateline showed Winata re-enacting Corby’s lunge to stop him opening her bag. He seemed as honest as Corby does, and said he had no doubt of her guilt.

    Winata looked inside and found 4.1kg of top-quality marijuana, stowed in two airlock plastic bags, one tucked inside the other.

    What is it, he asked?

    “It’s marijuana,” the officials heard Corby reply.

    Keep thinking how this all must look to an Indonesian. Who would you believe?

    Think how it seems when the marijuana turns out to be hydroponically grown, and worth anywhere up to $80,000 in Bali, where it is prized by expatriates who are sick of the weak local weed and feel safer buying from a tourist. Big profits.

    Keep picturing. The Indonesians learn that Corby, although having no criminal record, comes from a wild and woolly family.

    One of her brothers is in jail for burglary and stealing, her mother is on to her fourth partner after having six children by three men. Her father had a minor conviction some 30 years ago for possessing marijuana.

    Sure, none of that makes her guilty, but how would all this make Corby seem to an Indonesian? Here’s a tip: Not like she came from the responsible land of the straight-and-narrow.

    It gets worse. Corby’s defence team is soon headed by a salesman who looks like a spiv and is a former bankrupt who still owes creditors plenty.

    Her main defence witness becomes an alleged rapist flown in from a Melbourne jail to tell how he heard some crook who’d heard some other crook say Corby was unwittingly carrying drugs for crooks operating at the Brisbane and Sydney airport terminals.

    With Australians like this behind Corby, it’s a wonder the whole country wasn’t tossed into the cell with her.

    The judges are then asked to believe these unknown smugglers took the marijuana into a high-security area at Brisbane in easy-to-see-through plastic and popped it into a random bag to be flown to another high-security area in Sydney.

    Why the smugglers would do that, rather than simply drive the drugs down to Sydney by car, all safe, no one can say. That they then let their valuable drugs fly off to Bali is another mystery.

    No wonder our own Australian Federal Police Commissioner Mick Keelty dismissed Corby’s theory as “flimsy”. Corby’s judges must have thought her team took them for idiots.

    Idiots? They soon learned plenty of Australians took them for far worse. And now it was not Corby on trial, and losing, but Australia.

    In one heady spasm, hundreds of thousands of Australians became certain that Corby the beautiful battler was in fact innocent.

    Suddenly she was the star of a reality-TV Perils of Pauline — complete with cartoon-like big breasts, every-woman prettiness and more tears than a soapie. It helped the plot that she was repeatedly filmed hands bound and besieged, pale in a jabbering, jostling crowd of brown foreigners.

    Damn those natives. “The judges don’t even speak English, mate, they’re straight out of the trees, if you excuse my expression,” raged 2GB Sydney fill-in host Malcolm T. Elliott.

    “Whoa, give them a banana and away they go.”

    Others screamed that the judges were lying Muslims out for revenge (in fact, the chief judge was a Christian, and the other two Hindus).

    Newspapers attacked Indonesia’s courts as corrupt and their jails as temples of “gloating sadism” where there was “little sympathy of foreigners, for which you may perhaps read Christians”. Save “our” Schapelle from the demon heathen!

    No surprise, then, that Indonesian officials here were bombarded with so many threats and insults that Foreign Affairs Minister Alexander Downer had to plead for them to be left alone. What would we say of Indonesians if our own diplomats were monstered like this?

    Now Corby’s defenders demand we boycott struggling Bali. Actor Russell Crowe, among others, even warned Indonesia to remember we gave money for its tsunami victims — as if we only gave charity in exchange for passes out of jail.

    Sick, but the feeling has grown. The Salvation Army, out on its Red Shield appeal, had to promise not to send donations to Indonesia. Let their poor suffer for “our” Schapelle.

    Meanwhile, radio hosts insisted the Prime Minister call the Indonesian President to fix things in court for Corby, as if such interference wasn’t plainly corrupt.

    Worryingly, even senior politicians lost their heads in the hysteria, with Justice Minister Chris Ellison vowing to try bringing Corby home in a “one-off” prisoner exchange. The other 150 Australians in jail overseas should get breast implants.

    HAVE we lost our heads? Are we really such a vile rabble?

    What must Indonesians make of this hissing mob that threatens their diplomats, vilifies their country, blackmails them with aid and treats their judges as the corrupt playthings of our politicians? And all this for the sake of a convicted drug smuggler who seems quite probably guilty, and only possibly innocent.

    Even our whinges about their drug laws must seem bizarre. Guess who truly has the worst laws — Indonesia, which gave Corby 20 years’ jail for having 4.1kg of marijuana; or Victoria, which meanwhile gave a mere 12-month community service order to a teacher found with 29kg — and let her keep her teaching licence?

    So how must we seem to Indonesians? Like barbarians, or even terrorists, and it’s hard at the moment to think them very wrong.

    Profile photo of CoopsTCoopsT
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    @coopst
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    Sensational article xxx…spot on in my opinion. Some of the opinions being brandied about show a lack of understanding of legal systems in both Indo and Oz…yes they r guilty til proven innocent over there, but the laws of evidence work the same as they do here. Mick Keelty must be wondering what he did wrong, being criticised for stating the bleedingly obvious.

    Ask yourselves what punishment you would prefer for drug dealers/couriers in our community. Life in jail 9 times out of 10 or police handing out education material and pamphlets to career junkies. I know what i would prefer!!

    In relation to the indonesian boycott, that won’t last 6 months. The general public have very short memories for current affairs and as soon as another cheap package to bali is offered, we will be there in droves.

    Cheers

    Coops

    p.s Go you mighty Crows!!!

    Profile photo of ANUBISANUBIS
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    @anubis
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    There was a rally in Brisbane Friday afternoon to protest her imprisonment and demand action. 21 media representatives were in attendance – 6 protesters turned up.

    Perhaps there is a new cause in town we haven’t heard about yet.

    Profile photo of gatsbygatsby
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    @gatsby
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    xxx,
    excellent expose’ you’ve posted including a lot more information than the general public may not have been aware about (re: Corby’s case). Perhaps (?), more in reference to the issue here is drugs, per se and evolving an idea towards understanding that may result?
    a) Why is the drug Tsar of this country or any other country (actually lets go back!)
    Why do we have a drug Tsar in countries?
    b) Why is it a law maker/judge?
    c) Why isn’t it a person/s who’s had a drug and/or alcohol addiction and overcome it and why doesn’t he/she/they help people ‘overcome’ it with ‘COMPASSION’, rather than ‘CONDEMNATION?’
    d) Why do we put people who are on drugs in jail? They are sick. Sick people don’t get healed in jail? See it makes no sense and if we evolved the idea then the planet might become more ‘compassionate’ and something like ‘understanding’ might dawn?
    Cheers,
    Gatsby.

    Profile photo of DEViNE_BRUNETDEViNE_BRUNET
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    @devine_brunet
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    resiwealth, im in Melbourne myself. I think it was just a heat of the moment thing. The media would have heard one person say that [if anyone did] and they would of blew it out of porportion. From what i heard it was also the Americans and many other countries that wanted their money back not just Australians aslo the red cross apprantly wanted their money back. Which i could also understand as many countries including Aust donated millions and millions to support them and in return they couldnt look at the trial fairly. He ignored all relevant evidence that could have helped shapell in a big way. The judge himself also said “i made my decision from day one and a easy one that was” so thats telling me he didnt give a crap about the evidence even if she wasnt guilty that wouldnt of mattered. But at the end of the day i totally understand where your comming from the rest of the people/country shouldnt be punished because of the judges decison. The only person who knows the truth is shapell herself, so i kind of ignore all these assumptions and stories especially by the media and tabaloids.

    Australia isnt a bad place ;)

    Nici

    WHAT DOESN’T KiLL ME, ONLY MAKES ME STRONGER!

    Profile photo of richmondrichmond
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    Hi,

    As others have said – we weren’t in court, we can’t really 100% know her innocence or guilt, but even on the face of what has been reported, it is awfully difficult for me to believe she didn’t do it, the taking coal to Newcastle argument does not hold weight at all. She was caught red-handed, and if she was a 50 year old overweight male no-one would give a toss. Still, 20 years is way too much. I don’t have much confidence in her new-look legal team however, and their abilities to get her off, let alone have the sentence reduced, perhaps she’ll face the firing squad after all… (I hope not!)

    r

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