Forums / Property Investing / General Property / Do you have written goals?

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  • Profile photo of ShusharShushar
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    Originally posted by lozza123:

    Hi Acey,

    Well, I’ve been pretty big on goals lately…. I can especially recommend the Zig Ziglar tape set called “Goals”… it is very entertaining as well as explaining why you must have goals.

    Also I bought some Brian Tracy books… I can recommend “Eat that Frog”, which helps you get over procrastination. Currently I am using Brian Tracy’s “Maximum Achievement Goal Planner”, which basically helps you to identify what your goals might be (this was the hard part for me!)
    When you’ve worked out your three major goals, you then fill in a page each day, listing what you plan to do.

    One thing I can suggest, is to at least have a couple of things on your “list” to do every day. At least if you do SOMETHING toward your goals every day, you’ll feel great because you know you’re always heading in the right direction.

    One of my goals is to retire from work by the end of next year (I’m 35 now). Wish me luck!!

    Cheers,

    Lozza [biggrin]

    Wow – that is quite a goal. I do wish you every success.

    I’m currently working through John R. Burnley’s book – “Money Secrets of the Rich” which I’m finding very inspirational. The scary part is discovering that the repayments on all my loans exceed my income. Now I just need a Plan B.

    [smiling]

    Shushar

    Profile photo of JetDollarsJetDollars
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    Aceyducey,

    I have written goals and try to review them monthly (last week of the month). I realised that my goals was so conservative cos I achieved it 3 years earlier. So now I setting a new goals.

    Kind regards

    Chan Dollars
    [Retire Young, Retire Rich] [strum]

    Profile photo of CarLoverCarLover
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    I have written goals, that I review on a yearly basis.

    I also use a spreadsheet that helps me define my plan to reach my goal.

    CarLover.

    Profile photo of thefirstbrucethefirstbruce
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    Acey, interesting topic. I used to work in advertising. And became very aware of no matter who we are, we are either being influenced by the world outside our minds, or our own constructs and desires. So often I have well educated ppl argue against the power of advertising to influence them. I just tell them to go and open their fridge or pantry and look at all the brand names.

    I have the same view towards goals and values. If we drift along without a reasonable sense of where we are going, then the external world finds it easier to whip up impulse and appetite. i.e. if you are on your way home hungry and walk past a pizza shop, and have no idea of what you will cook for dinner, then it is so much easier to buy that pizza. So, for me, goals and planning at least serve to make me less vulnerable to impulse, impulse whipped up by a world often not interested in my wellbeing, just my money.

    Further, if one wants to control or lose weight, then one does well to be more conscious of what they are eating, how many Calories approx they are putting in their mouths. One of the strongest ways to attain this is to have a meal plan for a week, esp when you have to feed kids. The same applies to things financial. When you have a plan for what you are going to do with your money (or time to make money), it is less likely to be spent impulsively on immediate gratification, because you are more conscious of longer term gratification.

    Bruce
    Mooloolaba, Qld

    Profile photo of SiboSibo
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    FirstBruce,
    I really liked that reply. I think you summed it up pretty well – either we decide our influences or they will be decided for us. I think similar ideas can be related to culture -either we decide what is desirable for our culture or we let it fall to the advertising companies and others of the like.

    Regards,
    Si

    Profile photo of thefirstbrucethefirstbruce
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    Thanks Sibo,

    I agree with you on the culture thing too. I often ask myself about the saying “to stand for everything is to stand for nothing”. I like to walk a middle ground between being tolerant, but aware of the benefits of a well considered morality. To me, there are many loud voices pushing open slather, extreme lefties often condemn traditional morality and values, and extreme righties want less intervention of govt to protect consumers.

    I think of road rage, tailgaters, speeders, people not using indicators, people going slow in the inside lane, etc. I think of service industry staff who just don’t understand service. I think of how parents let their kids get away with bad behaviour in public places, and I know that is the sort of culture I don’t want to be a part of.

    It would be good for Australia to have more open public debate about how to foster desirable values and culture.

    Bruce
    Mooloolaba, Qld

    Profile photo of AceyduceyAceyducey
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    Originally posted by thefirstbruce:

    i.e. if you are on your way home hungry and walk past a pizza shop, and have no idea of what you will cook for dinner, then it is so much easier to buy that pizza.

    I agree Bruce!

    Steer your own ship because if you let go of the tiller there’s any number of entities and organisations who are happy to take control of your direction.

    The worst thing is that people in this situation think that the decisions they go along with are the ones they make themselves!

    One good guideline when shopping is to always take a list & to NEVER enter a supermarket when hungry. Studies have shown that people who go in hungry buy more, as do people without lists.

    Personally I make it a challenge (and a game for the kids) to have as few brands in the trolley as possible….and the kids have learnt that just because a product comes in two or more sizes, the largest package isn’t always the cheapest!

    Cheers,

    Aceyducey

    Profile photo of CeliviaCelivia
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    I must admit that I don’t have written down goals, although I’m not against setting goals. May be one day I will need or want them.

    I just don’t think it would work for me at the moment, to constantly have to think about things that I, because I wrote them down, I now ‘have to’ do. To disappoint myself because I ‘haven’t done’ them.

    But having no written goals does not mean I don’t have dreams!
    It feels good enough for me just to let myself flow towards those dreams, naturally.

    I hope to look back onto my life when I’m old and be proud of what I have done-or haven’t done.
    ANd that, as Aussierogue has said, means that I’m aiming to be the best person I can be. And being that needs constant work.
    I hope one day before I die I will be the person I wanna be, and be able to ‘bow to myself’ for what I have become.

    Profile photo of kay henrykay henry
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    Cil,

    I think we’re looking at it differently than some. I’m like you- strive to be a good person (but don’t strive so hard that it becomes boring!!) For me, financial goal-setting etc is not so much the way my head works. I don’t see life as an accumulation of wealth. I just think that’s another fun part of life. But so is love, and work, and golf, and having a picnic [blush2]
    And I don’t have to write those things down to do them. I live life day to day, mosey along, and always try to have fun. And writing down goals doesn’t assist serviceability. I could write down about having the ferrari and living on the north shore. But really, what I want is what I have mentioned above- simple things, happy things.

    Oh, and Bruce, you said:

    “I like to walk a middle ground between being tolerant, but aware of the benefits of a well considered morality. To me, there are many loud voices pushing open slather, extreme lefties often condemn traditional morality and values”

    That doesn’t sound very “tolerant” hehe. I believe, for example, that looking up children of assylum-seekers is not hugely moral- and the legality of it- well, it only happens in Australia, and is not legal anywhere else in the world. I don’t really use the word “moral” but I do believe I have very strong “principles”. I go further than the word “tolerance” and believe in “acceptance”. On this board, one sees a variety of opinions and choices and lifestyles. Your goal-setting might be very different to mine, but you’re entitled to it, and I acept that :)

    kay henry

    Profile photo of thefirstbrucethefirstbruce
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    Kay, from other comments you have made on the forum, I accept that our politics and lifestyles are different. I don’t accept that I have a superior view on all and sundry, hence why I am open to let others live lives based on well considered principles or morals different to my own.

    I wish there was just more open intelligent debate about these things, instead of PC and intellectual elites and interest groups trying to all antagonistically bury each other’s POV. These issues really are too critical to what Australia might become.

    BTW, I have an issue with the term ‘asylum seeker’. I complained to the ABC about their ad hoc choice of this term, as well as several govt depts. The line I received back is that anyone who arrives in Australia, whether gun runner, drug smuggler, eccentric English sailor, psychotic American millionaire, who doesn’t possess a valid visa to enter the country, and claims they are in danger of persecution in their home country, can automatically claim asylum seeker status. I for one don’t buy it. Afghanis don’t need political asylum once they enter Pakistan- they automatically get it there. They didn’t have to travel at extreme cost over 8 countries (3 of them Muslim) to gain political asylum. I think the term economic opportunism needs a little more press these days. Nevertheless, locking up economic opportunists for a year or three at significant cost (when old Australians are underserviced in nursing homes) isn’t the most sensible thing either.

    Bruce
    Mooloolaba, Qld

    Profile photo of kay henrykay henry
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    Bruce,

    Thanks for your reply :) I am not sure what other people’s politics are really, unless they declare them. As for me, I do enjoy discussion on a variey of topics, real estate investment being merely one of them. I know that I am not an “intellectual elite” and nor are my firends and family, but we do have discussions on the things you’ve mentioned all the time. People usually discuss things that are important to them. I don’t see that those topics are in the intellectual domain. I just see they’re topics of value to us all.

    Regarding lifestyle, yes, every individual on the planet has one and they do vary. I am always just pleased to see people enjoying their lives- beingin good relationships, having a calm and peaceful mind. If you’re happy with your lifestyle, Bruce, then I’m happy for you :))

    kay henry

    Profile photo of AceyduceyAceyducey
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    Originally posted by kay henry:

    For me, financial goal-setting etc is not so much the way my head works. I don’t see life as an accumulation of wealth.

    Kay,

    Goals don’t have to be financially based.

    A goal can very well be to have a picnic every month with someone you love.

    Personally the majority of my goals are personal achievement ones :)

    And BTW – I don’t think anyone who has commented that they have goals is making any comment on the fact that you don’t :)

    BTW: I agree that our asylum policies are horrendous – but I disagree that they are the worst in the world…We benchmark favourable with a number of military dictatorships who also imprison people indefinitely, including children, and refuse them human rights as agreed under UN charter.

    I campaign regularly on the topic in other areas of my life – it’s actually in my personal goals :)

    Cheers,
    Aceyducey

    Profile photo of kay henrykay henry
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    hehe Acey… :+P

    In fact, I DO have goals, I suppose if one could call them that. I seek to be happy etc. I guess I could write it down, then every so ofen, I could change the font, shadow it, and stuff. Perhaps I’ll do that on a very slow day ;)

    Acey, this is a discussion forum. People have differing perspectives. Look at every topic and you’ll see a range of different responses and opposite points of view.

    You can handle it, can’t ya? :)

    kay henry

    Profile photo of theloanarrangertheloanarranger
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    Re Goals: Picture your favorite AFL/ soccer/basketball/waterpolo/etc team playing.
    Now take away the goals – wattaya got? A bunch of people playing around, making passes at one another. And when the match is over, all they’ve got to show for their efforts, (ok, apart from increased fitness and maybe some new friends..) is they’re pretty tired and a little bit older.

    Big or small, modest or ambitious, have some goals – if you don’t know what you want, how will you know when you’ve got it?

    theloanarranger

    Profile photo of lifeXlifeX
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    Goals, mmmmmm.

    If you have clear goals you may acheive huge things……,

    but then you might miss the smell of the roses on the way…..,

    but then you might only ever smell a few roses when the whole flower shop is up the road and could be reached if you stuck to your goals…

    , but then we all die anyway, why not enjoy life now…..,

    But what if we don’t die……,

    And what if I’m just a figment of someone elses imagination….,

    or my own imagination!!!,,,,

    What if the computer screen is actually typing on me, what if…. what if…[dunny]

    [offtopic]

    what was the question again, oh.

    I got big plans for me and the world, and couldn’t acheive them without fast powerful goals.

    Choose whats best for you.[angel]

    lifexperience

    Profile photo of AceyduceyAceyducey
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    Originally posted by kay henry:

    Acey, this is a discussion forum. People have differing perspectives. Look at every topic and you’ll see a range of different responses and opposite points of view.

    You can handle it, can’t ya? :)

    Do you actually READ my posts before replying Kay?

    From my last post:

    And BTW – I don’t think anyone who has commented that they have goals is making any comment on the fact that you don’t :)

    Kay, no chips on shoulders please. All of us are simply stating our own views.

    Cheers,

    Aceyducey

    Profile photo of thefirstbrucethefirstbruce
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    Acey, I meant to say nice strategy with your kids at the supermarket. Giving them that goal would certainly preoccupy their minds as they wheeled past the coke cookies and confectionary.
    And I also try to stick to fruit and vege and avoid processed foods myself.

    I think childrens’ minds probably provide a more powerful analogy of the value of goal setting. I can think of so many occasions where a child, without anything to occupy their time and attention, run amok. Give them a task, and they focus and feel a great sense of accomplishment and self confidence after completing it. I am sure the same applies to adults.

    nevertheless, I resonate with Kay and others that life should be spontaneous as well. It is all a matter of getting a healthy considered balance for each various personality within their circumstances. Seems the pendulum has swung too far away from serious preparation for the future these days for many of us. Hence the high household debt and consumerist mindset. This newsgroup is a welcome relief in that it is an opportunity to exchange ideas with those who are trying to plan for the future.

    Bruce
    Mooloolaba, Qld

    Profile photo of kay henrykay henry
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    Acey Mate,

    Please don’t name-call. Suggesting I have a chip on my shoulder (presumably that means I am somehow jealous of other people???) is provocative and unnecessary. You may think what you will, but I’d rather, if you choose to put me down in whatever way you need to, that you might PM me the message. I am sure others are not interested in hearing you name-calling, but if you must, i’ll accept it in private.

    kay henry

    Profile photo of AceyduceyAceyducey
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    Originally posted by kay henry:

    Please don’t name-call.

    I’m sorry Kay – I don’t understand your point.

    There were no names called.

    I thought the idea was to talk about goal setting, not about people who don’t set goals & get defensive about people who do.

    Cheers,

    Aceyducey

    Profile photo of kay henrykay henry
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    This is name-calling, Acey. You said:

    “Kay, no chips on shoulders please.”

    However, if you don’t see it as such, Acey, then we do have very different ways of seeing the world. Anyway, I think I’ve made my point.

    kay henry

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